The Friday Post ~ 15th December 2017

OK …. let’s get this over and done with.  It’s unpleasant, and I know that it will cause you some anguish and pain, and even cause you to close all the curtains and lie down with either a cake, a bar of chocolate or a stiff drink ….  or maybe all three if the first one doesn’t work …  so we’ll just do it and get it over with, OK?

Get ready. Sit up straight and gird your loins.

We know that this may be dangerous or difficult for your brain to compute, but we’re going to do it because we is ADULTS!

Ready?

Deep breath in …..  let it out slowly as if you are blowing down a straw ….

….  ….  ….  there are … … … …  nine days till Christmas (not counting today or the day itself).

I know… I know.  Some of you will find that a thoroughly unpleasant thought.  But we have to face it at some point.  No good skirting around it or believing that, if no one mentions it then it’s not really that close.  Your advent calendar should be telling you the truth!  Look on me as your unpaid for, not stolen, loving,  living, breathing, caring, Advent Calendar.

So anyhoo … we’ve got that over and done with so shall we get on with some edumacation?  Good.  Let’s get on with it then . . .

On This Day in History

1791 – The United States Bill of Rights becomes law when ratified by the Virginia legislature.

1863 – Romania used for the first time a mountain railway (from Anina to Oravita). A mountain railway is a railway that ascends and descends a mountain slope that has a steep grade.  Such railways can use a number of different technologies to overcome the steepness of the grade. Mountain railways commonly have a narrow gauge to allow for tight curves in the track and reduce tunnel size and structure gauge, and hence construction cost and effort.

1891 – James Naismith introduces the first version of basketball, with thirteen rules, a peach basket nailed to either end of his school’s gymnasium, and two teams of nine players.

1905 – The Pushkin House is established in St. Petersburg to preserve the cultural heritage of Alexander Pushkin. Alexander Sergeevich Pushkin (June 6 1799 – February 10 1837) was a Russian Romantic author who is considered to be the greatest Russian poet and the founder of modern Russian literature. Pushkin pioneered the use of vernacular speech in his poems and plays, creating a style of storytelling – mixing drama, romance, and satire – associated with Russian literature ever since and greatly influencing later Russian writers.

Born in Moscow, Pushkin published his first poem at the age of fifteen, and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Imperial Lyceum in Tsarskoe Selo. Pushkin gradually became committed to social reform and emerged as a spokesman for literary radicals; in the early 1820s he clashed with the government, which sent him into exile in southern Russia. While under the strict surveillance of government censors and unable to travel or publish at will, he wrote his most famous play, the drama Boris Godunov, but could not publish it until years later. His novel in verse, Eugene Onegin, was published serially from 1825 to 1832.

Pushkin and his wife Natalya Goncharova, whom he married in 1831, later became regulars of court society. In 1837, while falling into greater and greater debt amidst rumors that his wife had started conducting a scandalous affair, Pushkin challenged her alleged lover, Georges d’Anthe’s, to a duel. Pushkin was mortally wounded and died two days later.

Because of his liberal political views and influence on generations of Russian rebels, Pushkin was portrayed by Bolsheviks as an opponent to bourgeois literature and culture and a predecessor of Soviet literature and poetry. In 1937, the town of Tsarskoe Selo was renamed Pushkin in his honor.

1914 – Gas explosion at Mitsubishi Hojyo coal mine Japan, 687 killed. This accident is the worst coal mine disaster in Japanese history.

1939 – Gone with the Wind premiered at Loew’s Grand Theater in Atlanta, GA, USA. Gone with the Wind is a 1939 American dramatic-romantic-war film adapted from Margaret Mitchell’s 1936 novel of the same name and directed by Victor Fleming (Fleming replaced George Cukor).  The epic film, set in the American South in and around the time of the Civil War, stars Vivien Leigh, Clark Gable, Leslie Howard, and Olivia de Havilland, and tells a story of the Civil War and its aftermath from a white Southern viewpoint.

Gone with the wind

It received ten Academy Awards, a record that stood for twenty years. In the American Film Institute’s inaugural Top 100 American Films of All Time list of 1998, it was ranked number four, although in the 2007 10th Anniversary edition of that list, it was dropped two places, to number six. In June 2008, AFI revealed its 10 top 10 the best ten films in ten American film genres after polling over 1,500 persons from the creative community. Gone with the Wind was acknowledged as the fourth best film in the Epic genre. It has sold more tickets in the U.S. than any other film in history, and is considered a prototype of a Hollywood blockbuster. Today, it is considered one of the greatest and most popular films of all time and one of the most enduring symbols of the golden age of Hollywood. (I haven’t ever managed to watch this film all the way through. I’ve seen bits of it, but never seen the film from start to finish, in full).

1960 – Richard Paul Pavlick is arrested for attempting to blow up and assassinate the U.S. President-Elect, John F. Kennedy only four days earlier. Richard Paul Pavlick (February 13, 1887 ¨C November 11, 1975) was a retired postal worker from New Hampshire who stalked and then attempted to assassinate U.S. President-Elect John F. Kennedy on Sunday, December 11, 1960 in Palm Beach, Florida. He failed, but 3 years later in Dallas, Texas, Kennedy was killed by Lee Harvey Oswald.

Richard Paul Pavlick The Cobweborium

Richard Paul Pavlick

Pavlick, 73 years old at the time of the assassination attempt, had previously lived in the small town of Belmont, New Hampshire with no family. He became known at local public meetings for his angry political rants, which included complaints that the American flag was not being displayed appropriately, and also criticized the government and disparaged Catholics, focusing much of his anger on the Kennedy family and their wealth. On one occasion, Pavlick’s anger erupted when he met the supervisor of the local water company at his home with a gun, which was then confiscated.

Pavlick’s enmity toward John F. Kennedy boiled over after the close 1960 U.S. Presidential election, in which Kennedy had defeated Republican Richard Nixon by 118,000 votes. Turning over his run-down property to a local youth camp, Pavlick disappeared after loading his meager possessions into his 1950 Buick.

After Pavlick left town, Thomas M. Murphy, the 34-year-old U.S. Postmaster of the town of Belmont, New Hampshire began receiving bizarre postcards from Pavlick that stated the town would hear from him soon “in a big way.” Murphy soon noticed that the postmarked dates coincided with visits by John F. Kennedy to the communities and he then called the local police. The local police, in turn, contacted the Secret Service, who interviewed locals and learned of his previous outbursts. In the midst of these conversations, they also found out that Pavlick had purchased dynamite.

During his travels, Pavlick had visited the Kennedy compound at Hyannis Port, Massachusetts, photographing the Kennedy home while also checking out the compound’s security.

Shortly before 10 a.m. on Sunday, December 11, as John F. Kennedy was preparing to leave for Mass at St. Edward Church in Palm Beach, Pavlick waited in his dynamite-laden car hoping to crash his car into Kennedy’s vehicle to cause a fatal explosion. However, Pavlick changed his mind after seeing John F. Kennedy with his wife, Jacqueline, and the couple’s two small children.

While waiting for another opportunity over the next few days, Pavlick visited the church to learn its interior, but the Secret Service had informed local Palm Beach police to look for Pavlick’s automobile.

Four days after the attempt, on Thursday, December 15, Palm Beach, police officer, Lester Free, spotted Pavlick’s vehicle as he entered the city via the Flagler Memorial Bridge into Royal Poinciana Way. Police immediately surrounded the car (which still contained 10 sticks of dynamite) and arrested him. After his arrest, Pavlick said, “Kennedy money bought the White House and the presidency. I had the crazy idea I wanted to stop Kennedy from being President.”

On January 27, 1961, Pavlick was committed to the United States Public Health Service mental hospital in Springfield, Missouri, then was indicted for threatening Kennedy’s life seven weeks later.

In a tragically ironic twist, charges against Pavlick were dropped on December 2, 1963, ten days after Kennedy’s assassination in Dallas. Judge Emmet C. Choate ruled that Pavlick was unable to distinguish between right and wrong in his actions, but kept him in the mental hospital. The federal government also dropped charges in August 1964, and Pavlick was eventually released from the New Hampshire State Mental Hospital on December 13, 1966.

Pavlick died at the age of 88 on November 11, 1975 at the Veterans Administration Hospital in Manchester, New Hampshire-eleven days short of the 12th anniversary of Kennedy assassination.

1973 – John Paul Getty III, grandson of J. Paul Getty, American billionaire is found alive near Naples, Italy, after being kidnapped by an Italian gang on July 10, 1973.

1993 – History of Northern Ireland: The Downing Street Declaration is issued by British Prime Minister John Major and Irish Taoiseach Albert Reynolds. The Downing Street Declaration was a joint declaration issued on December 15, 1993 by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, John Major and Albert Reynolds, the Taoiseach of Ireland. It affirmed the right of the people of Northern Ireland to self-determination, and that the province would be transferred to the Republic of Ireland from the United Kingdom if and only if a majority of its population was in favour of such a move. It included for the first time in the history of Anglo-Irish relationships, as part of the prospective of the so-called Irish dimension, the principle that the people of the island of Ireland, North and South had the exclusive right to solve the issues between North and South by mutual consent. The latter statement was key to produce a positive change of attitude by the Republicans towards a negotiated settlement.

The joint declaration also pledged the governments to seek a peaceful constitutional settlement, and promised that parties linked with paramilitaries (such as Sinn Fein) could take part in the talks, so long as they abandoned violence.

The declaration, after it was ‘clarified’ by the Northern Ireland Office, was considered sufficient by the Provisional Irish Republican Army to announce a ceasefire on August 31, 1994 which was then followed on October 13, by an announcement of a ceasefire from the Combined Loyalist Military Command.

2001 – The Leaning Tower of Pisa reopens after 11 years and $27,000,000 to fortify it, without fixing its famous lean. The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italian: Torre pendente di Pisa) or simply The Tower of Pisa (La Torre di Pisa) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa. It is situated behind the cathedral and is the third oldest structure in Pisa’s Piazza del Duomo (Cathedral Square) after the cathedral and the baptistry.

Although intended to stand vertically, the tower began leaning to the southeast soon after the onset of construction in 1173 due to a poorly laid foundation and loose substrate that has allowed the foundation to shift direction. The tower presently leans to the southwest.

The height of the tower is 55.86 m (183.27 ft) from the ground on the lowest side and 56.70 m (186.02 ft) on the highest side.  The width of the walls at the base is 4.09 m (13.42 ft) and at the top 2.48 m (8.14 ft).  Its weight is estimated at 14,500 metric tons (16,000 short tons).  The tower has 296 or 294 steps; the seventh floor has two fewer steps on the north-facing staircase.  The tower leans at an angle of 3.97 degrees.  This means that the top of the tower is 3.9 metres (12 ft 10 in) from where it would stand if the tower were perfectly vertical.   BBC News on the Day – The Leaning Tower of Pisa

2005 – The 2005 Atlantic Power Outage began. The Atlantic Power Outage of 2005 caused hundreds of thousands of people along the Atlantic coast of the United States to suffer power outages. Winter ice storms caused power cuts starting on December 15, 2005.

Electricity was not restored in many places until December 20, 2005, by which time one death was blamed on the outage.

 

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Born on This Day

1892 – J. Paul Getty, American oil tycoon (d. 1976)

1939 – Cindy Birdsong, American singer (The Supremes)

1942 – Dave Clark, English musician (The Dave Clark Five)

1948 – Cassandra Harris, Australian actress (d. 1991) – Born Sandra Colleen Waites in Sydney, Australia, Harris was a student of NIDA acting school from 1960 to 1963 and performed in the successful Sydney stage production of Boeing Boeing from 1964 to 1965. She appeared in The Greek Tycoon (1978), Rough Cut (1980), and the James Bond film, For Your Eyes Only as the Countess Lisl von Schlaf, the ill-fated mistress of Milos Colombo (played by Israeli actor Topol). While she was filming this movie, her third husband, Pierce Brosnan, met James Bond series producer Albert R. Broccoli, which eventually led to his casting as the new James Bond with starring roles in four James Bond films. Harris had allegedly always wanted to see her husband portray James Bond, but her death occurred prior to his selection for the role in “Golden Eye.”

1949 – Don Johnson, American actor

1955 – Paul Simonon, English bassist (The Clash)

1963 – Andrew Luster, Max Factor heir

1970 – Frankie Dettori, Italian jockey

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Died on this Day and Remembered here

1944 – Glenn Miller, American musician (later declared dead on this date, exact date of death unknown) (b. 1904)

1962 – Charles Laughton, English actor (b. 1899)

1966 – Walt Disney, American animator (b. 1901)

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Thought for the Day

Every book starts with just one word.

Every great idea is sparked by a single thought.

Every morning sees a new sunrise.

And every journey begins with a single step.

So now, knowing all of this, why are you waiting for whatever you’re waiting for?

If you don’t begin, you can’t win!

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And finally . . .

I think it’s time, since it’s only NINE DAYS TILL CHRISTMAS DAY, to break out the old joke book and give you a few smiles to take out into your day, and annoy other people with.  Obviously, given the time of year, it’s going to be Christmas Jokes, so whine all you like,  I shall simply end up asking you if you’d like a little cheese with that whine.

What does Santa suffer from if he gets stuck in a chimney?
Claustrophobia!

What do you call an elf who sings?
A wrapper!

Why does Santa have three gardens?
So he can ‘ho ho ho’!

Why does Santa Claus go down the chimney on Christmas Eve?
Because it soot’s him

Why did Santa go to the doctor?
Because of his bad “elf”!

Why are Christmas trees so fond of the past?
Because the present’s beneath them.

What kind of motorbike does Santa ride?
A Holly Davidson!

What do you call a cat in the desert?
Sandy Claws!

And that, indeed, is ‘all folks’!

Thank you so much for coming and having a coffee moment with me.  I so love it when we all get together around the table and have a few giggles and laughs over a coffee, and a bit of an Ooooh and Aaaah, over the history of the day.

May your Friday be wonderful.  I hope the day gently does what Fridays normally do – get to the end and give you a sigh.  May you find some fun in the day, and see that the mood you’re in was a choice.  When you realise this, you can then decide to make a better choice.  Choose your mood wisely.  Who knows what might be dependant upon what mood you’re in.

Sending you my warmest wishes during this cold December that most of us are experiencing.  Stay warm, dress right for the weather, and come home safely.

Have a truly blessed day, my fabulous friends ~

sig-coffee-copy

 

 

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The Friday Post ~ 8th December 2017

Is it really actually a week since I was last here with last Fridays Post?  Are we really sure that some form of trickery isn’t at work here? – for I don’t feel like I’m in receipt of a full weeks worth of days.  Something fishy is going on, I swear to Dog.  Perhaps it’s Fairy Trickery?  Maybe Trickery of the Harry Potter design.  Or is it …. our Governments playing with time and doing that Men in Black gadget thing and wiping out brains and inserting a little widgety type of thing telling us that we’ve all had Sunday or Tuesday – when we really haven’t at all.

Something’s going on, and we need to get to the bottom of it.  Followers Don your Men/Women in Black outfits;  put on your sunglasses and make sure you have all the equipment you need,  for we are about to get to the bottoms of our Governments and find out exactly what they are doing with time.  We all know they’re fiddling with it in some way – we just have to find out what the way is, and put it right again!

Aaanyhoo …. in the meantime, shall we all get some extra edumacation?  Note books and pens on the desk please. Pin back your ears for we are about to begin…..

On This Day in History

1841 – Prince Albert Edward, later King Edward VII, became the Prince of Wales.

1863 – The world’s first heavyweight boxing championship took place at Woodhurst, Kent, between Tom King (England) and John C Heenan (US). King was the Champion.

1864 – The Clifton Suspension Bridge over the River Avon is officially opened. The Clifton Suspension Bridge is a suspension bridge, spanning the Avon Gorge and linking Clifton in Bristol to Leigh Woods in North Somerset, England.  Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, it is a landmark that is used as a symbol of Bristol.  It is a grade I listed building.

1941 – World War II: The Japanese invade the British Crown Colony of Hong Kong, Malaya and the Dutch East Indies. They also invade the portions of Shanghai administered by European powers and bomb American bases in the Philippines.  Because of the time difference, these events – which took place west of the International Date Line – happened while it was still December 7 to the east of this line.
1941 – World War II: Pacific War – After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor the U.S. Congress passes a declaration of war against Japan.
1941 – World War II: Pacific War – the Republic of China officially declares war against Japan.

1941 – Holocaust: Gas vans are first used as a means of execution, at the Chelmno extermination camp near Lodz in Poland. The gas van was an extermination method devised by Nazi Germany to kill their victims during the Holocaust.

Holocaust Gas vans

A Gas Van

It was a vehicle with an air-tight compartment for victims into which exhaust fumes were transmitted while the engine was running. As a result the victims were gassed with carbon monoxide, resulting in death by the combined effects of carbon monoxide poisoning and suffocation.

Gas vans were used, particularly at Chemno extermination camp, until gas chambers were developed as a more efficient method for killing large numbers of people.

1952 – Her Majesty the Queen announced that she would permit her coronation to be televised.

1953 – Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the Atoms for Peace speech.  “Atoms for Peace” was the title of a speech delivered by U.S. President Dwight D. Eisenhower to the UN General Assembly in New York City on December 8, 1953.

Pres.Eisenhower

“I feel impelled to speak today in a language that in a sense is new—one which I, who have spent so much of my life in the military profession, would have preferred never to use.
That new language is the language of atomic warfare.”

The United States then launched an “Atoms for Peace” program that supplied equipment and information to schools, hospitals, and research institutions within the U.S. and throughout the world.

The speech was possibly a tipping point for international focus on peaceful uses of atomic energy, even during the early stages of the Cold War. It could be argued that Eisenhower, with some influence from Albert Einstein, was attempting to convey a spirit of comfort to a terrified world that the horror of Hiroshima and Nagasaki would not be experienced again.

It presents an ostensible antithesis to brinksmanship, the international intrigue that subsequently kept the world at the edge of war.

Eisenhower’s invoking of “…those same great concepts of universal peace and human dignity which are so clearly etched in…” the UN Charter, placed new emphasis upon the US’s grave responsibility for its nuclear actions— past, present and future. In a large way, this address laid down the rules of engagement for the new kind of warfare, the cold war.

In the heavy field of today’s superpower politics and technological progress, one might recall:

“It is with the book of history, and not with isolated pages, that the United States will ever wish to be identified.  My country wants to be constructive, not destructive.  It wants agreement, not wars, among nations.  It wants itself to live in freedom, and in the confidence that the people of every other nation enjoy equally the right of choosing their own way of life.”

• “To the making of these fateful decisions, the United States pledges before you — and therefore before the world — its determination to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma — to devote its entire heart and mind to find the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life.”

1963 – Pan Am Flight 214 crashes outside Elkton, Maryland with a loss of 81 people.
1969 – An Olympic Airways Douglas DC-6 crashes in Keratea during a storm, killing 93 people.

1972 – United Airlines Flight 553 crashes near Chicago Midway Airport, killing 45 people.

1980 – Mark David Chapman shoots and kills John Lennon in front of The Dakota department building.  

John Lennon in 1980, shortly before his death

John Lennon in 1980, shortly before his death

Mark David Chapman (born May 10, 1955 in Fort Worth, Texas) murdered English musician and activist John Lennon on December 8, 1980 in New York City.

The entrance to the Dakota building where Lennon was shot

The entrance to the Dakota building where Lennon was shot

Chapman shot Lennon four times in the back outside The Dakota apartment building, in the presence of Lennon’s wife Yoko Ono and others. Chapman remained at the scene until arrested by police.

Mark David Chapman best known for murdering John Lennon outside New York City apartment building in1980

Mark David Chapman – who shot and killed John Lennon

A scheduled jury trial did not go ahead because Chapman changed his plea from not guilty by reason of insanity to guilty of second degree murder, against the advice of his lawyer. He had been raped in jail 5 times and assessed as delusional and possibly psychotic, and the defense team argued that Chapman was not competent to make the decision.

Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York, where Chapman was imprisoned from 1981 to 2012

Attica Correctional Facility in Attica, New York

However, Chapman was sentenced to a prison term of 20 years to life and remains incarcerated at Attica State Prison in New York, having been denied parole five times. His applications for parole have been opposed by Yoko Ono, as well as by an online grassroots public campaign.

Mark David Chapman's mug shot June 2013

Mark David Chapman’s mug shot June 2013.

Chapman has been widely associated with the book The Catcher in the Rye, which he carried with him at the time and claimed would explain his perspective.  Various specific motivations have also been suggested.  Chapman has since stated that what he did was wrong.  There have been a number of interviews, books and films concerning Chapman and the murder of Lennon.

Chapman’s ninth parole application was denied in 2016, at which Chapman said he now saw his crime as being “premeditated, selfish and evil”.

His next parole hearing is scheduled for August 2018.

1982 – Activist Norman Mayer threatens to blow up the Washington Monument, before being killed by United States Park Police.  Norman David Mayer (March 31, 1916 – December 9, 1982) was an American anti-nuclear weapons activist who was shot and killed by the United States Park Police after threatening to blow up the Washington Monument.

1987 – The Queen Street Massacre: Frank Vitkovic shoots and kills 8 people at the offices of Australia Post in Melbourne, Australia before being killed himself. 22-year old Frank Vitkovic, a former law student, wanted to murder a former school friend, Con Margellis, who worked in the building, and then to take out as many others as possible before ending his own life. Earlier that day he had travelled to the University of Melbourne with the same murderous intent, but his intended target was not on-campus, thus he proceeded to Queen Street.

At around 4:00pm, Vitkovic walked into the building in Melbourne’s Queen Street holding a brown paper bag and carrying a sawn-off shotgun. He opened fire at the offices in Australia Post, leaving 8 fatalities and 5 injuries.

On entering the fifth floor office where the second intended victim worked, Vitkovic pulled a sawn-off shotgun from the bag and began firing at fleeing workers, killing a young woman office worker. The friend chosen as the original target escaped unharmed. Vitkovic then moved from floor to floor, where he walked through office areas picking his targets randomly, shooting some workers at close range execution style as they cowered under their desks, as well as murdering those in the elevators.

The massacre ended on the 11th floor, in the finance department, when the gun was wrestled from Vitkovic by office worker Frank Carmody, and hidden in a refrigerator by another worker. Vitkovic then took his own life, despite valiant attempts from the postal workers to save him, by breaking a window and diving to his death. This was witnessed by numerous onlookers, from all floors of the Australia Post building, since the building opposite was mirrored glass, as well as by others from the viewpoints of the opposite buildings, and others outside the building. Carmody was recommended for a bravery award after his actions in disarming the killer.

Victorian Police Minister Race Mathews and Attorney General Jim Kennan also witnessed the event from a building diagonally opposite while gathered for a meeting.

The murderer’s death was also seen in detail by many who had barricaded themselves inside the 18 floors of the Australia Post building, because the building opposite was a mirrored glass building. All these workers were barricaded in their offices from 4:00pm until 8:00pm. They had heard gunshots echoing up the stairwells around 4:00pm and, at first believing that the philatelic section was being robbed, had been told by management to barricade themselves in the safest of their offices. All these people had no knowledge of what was really occurring, and their only information, over these four hours, was misinformation from televisions in their offices, which were reporting that many gunshots had been heard, that people were barricaded in their offices, that scores of people may have been murdered or lay dying, and that police were not entering the building because of the possibility of terrorists. The police only entered the building around 8:00pm, after the murderer threw himself to his death. During these four hours, many people were severely traumatized, and continue to suffer debilitating post traumatic stress disorder to this day.

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Born on this Day

1542 – Mary Queen of Scots (d. 1587) Scottish Queen who ascended to the throne aged seven.  A rebellion led to her abdication and later Elizabeth I imprisoned her for the plot to restore the Roman Catholic religion and to take the throne from her

1922 – Lucian Freud, English painter

1925 – Sammy Davis Jr., American actor and singer (d. 1990)

1933 – Flip Wilson, American comedian (d. 1998)

1936 – David Carradine, American actor

1939 – Jerry “The Iceman” Butler, American soul singer

1939 – Sir James Galway, Northern Irish flautist

1941 – Sir Geoff Hurst, English footballer

1943 – Jim Morrison, American singer (The Doors) (d. 1971)

1951 – Bill Bryson, American author

1953 – Kim Basinger, American actress

1964 – Teri Hatcher, American actress

1966 – Sinéad O’Connor, Irish musician

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Thought for the day

I read recently about the top 50 things that people wanted to do before they died.  On that list were things like:  swim with dolphins.  Go wing-walking.  Gallop a horse along a beachoh … and lose weight was on there too!

It feels like there’s a new list of *this*  –  *that*  or  *the other* published almost every day.  As well as the ‘things to do before I die’  or ‘bucket list’ …  there are albums we must hear;  or the places we must visit;  books we must read;  places we must see;  events we must attend;  cars we must test drive;  clothes we must wear this season;  …  and the list of lists goes on and on and … (sigh).  All these lists tell us goals that we must set for ourselves if we are to feel that we are people truly living life.   And … if we’re not sure what our goals should be, then there are plenty of people absolutely dying to share their lists with us.

It would seem that three things attract us to these lists:  a desire to get hold of something good;  a lack of time to choose what is good;  and a concern that we are not achieving enough in life.

According to the people who support these lists, they are perfect for anxious professionals who have no time to embark on spiritual quests.  They provide us with a kind of short cut to ‘meaningful achievement and self-fulfilment‘.

But …is the setting of these personal goals and achieving them, going to bring fulfilment and peace?  Or will we – like the addicted consumer – be left with a nagging sense of there ‘being something else’ – some other goal that maybe can’t be reduced to a grocery list;  a goal that isn’t about self-fulfilment and that requires us to find and choose what is good?

In another age, a busy, anxious professional man asked Jesus what he needed to do to inherit eternal life.  Jesus referred the man to a well-known ‘life list’.  One made up of things we shouldn’t, as well as should, do.

The man proudly replied check‘ to each one of the commandments, but, he told Jesus, he suspected there was more than just that list of do’s and don’ts.

So he asked what he still lacked.  Jesus’ answer wasn’t  ‘go memorise the Torah’  or  ‘white water raft the Jordan’  – but instead “go sell your possessions and follow me.“.  It was a goal way too challenging for the man and we are told he went away sad and unfulfilled.  The man was expecting a  ‘things to do before you die’  list, and instead what he got was a  ‘die first and then discover your life‘  list.

If you feel you don’t have enough of whatever you think you should have . . .  imagine, just for a moment,  a hurricane sweeping through the land you currently live in.  Imagine this hurricane is SO strong that it sweeps your life clean of everything.  Every single thing you currently hold dear to you.  Your house?  Gone.  Your Car?  Gone.  Your Family?  All Gone.  Your Job?  Gone.  All your money (however little of it there is)?  Gone.  Your Clothes?  Gone.

Actually feel how that would feel.  Imagine being stood there, with NOTHING.  Nothing in the world to call your own, other than the clothes you’re wearing right now.  No one.  Just emptiness.

Feel that awful, dreadful feeling of being totally alone, with no one you know and no one who knows you.  No food, no money, no home, no family, friends, job, car, nothing.

Now imagine that one by one, things began to come back.  What would appear first?  How would that feel to have *that* back?  Then the next thingand the next …. and … on and on until eventually, over a short period of time, all your things came back.  Home, family, friends, car, clothes, happiness, joy, love, contentment.

Now ….  do you still think you aren’t blessed?  Do you really need to go and follow that bucket list in order to feel fulfilled?  Or do you recognise that everything you really actually want, is right there where you are.  You already have everything you need.

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There are 17 days till Christmas except there aren’t.  We can’t count Christmas day (as we discussed a couple of weeks ago) so there are only 16 days left till Christmas.  UNLESS … you’re reading this at the end of  Friday the 8th December – which in that case, you can’t really count the 8th so that would mean there were only 15 days till Christmas.  Getting closer all the time, eh?  😀

Now then … before I go, I read this ‘funny’ in a magazine the other day:

After a long Thanksgiving Day of eating and playing, a 3-year-old daughter asked her mother to carry her.  When I asked if her legs were broken, the little girls answered  “Yes, they’re out of batteries.”

Now this tickled the heck out of me because …  when my own two (now very grown up) girls were little and they wanted me to do something I really hadn’t got the energy to do (such as run around the garden with them to see who won) …  I would say (with a groan and a rubbing motion on my leg) …  Oh, but I can’t sweetheart.  I have a bone in my leg!  …  and this one sentence would work wonders and I could get out of the odd game of running, or chase.  Only occasionally mind – use it too much and it would soon wear thin because these girls were born with more brain cells than they have caused me to lose!

But like all children, these two darlings picked up some ‘useful’ things from their mother and took them forward into their own lives, and I fairly recently discovered that Daughter No. 2 (mother of Little Cobs) – has been using this very same excuse in her mummy role and has developed a ‘bone in her leg’ too.

I’m not sure whether to laugh gleefully and be proud, or tut tut tut and tell her off for shirking her ‘motherly duties’.  LOLOL.

Ahh  kids!  Gotta love ’em.  😉

Wishing you a wonderful Friday and a terrific weekend.  Thank you so much for coming and for sharing a coffee with me, while we sat at the table and had a few laughs.

Sending you much love and many squidges ~

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The Friday Post ~ 1st September 2017

Happy 1st September and,   after me I want you to say the following out loud  … ready?  WHITE RABBITS.   Said it?  Good.  You see, this is something I was taught by my grandparents to say on the very first day of any and every month.  It’s kind of good luck charm.  Something which would ensure that bad luck passed by you and only good luck came into your life.

Now you can scoff and say it’s rubbish … but hey,  it’s just two little words. What have you got to lose?

Today is in fact a very special day because…   September 1st  is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.  There are 121 days remaining until the end of the year.  This date is slightly more likely to fall on a Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday (58 in 400 years each) than on Sunday or Monday (57), and slightly less likely to occur on a Wednesday or Friday (56).  I think we should have a cake of some sort, to celebrate.  Shall we get our baking tins out and do something wonderful with them?

Right then … it’s Friday so that means it’s ‘Further Your Edumacation Day!’.  Do you have your pens, pencils and crayons ready?  Ok … let’s go then!

On this Day in History.

1159 Pope Adrian IV, (Nicholas Breakspeare), the only English pope, died.

1752 – The Liberty Bell arrives in Philadelphia. The Liberty Bell, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a bell that has served as one of the most prominent symbols of the American Revolutionary War. It is a familiar symbol of independence within the United States and has been described as an icon of liberty and justice.

You can learn more here:  US History – Liberty Bell.

1865 – In Great Britain – Joseph Lister performed the first antiseptic surgery.

1886 – The Severn Tunnel, (railway tunnel) between England and Wales, was opened for goods traffic

1920 – The Fountain of Time opens as a tribute to the 100 years of peace between the United States and Great Britain following the Treaty of Ghent.

The Treaty of Ghent was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Both sides signed it on December 24, 1814, in the city of Ghent, Belgium.

1939 – At dawn on 1st September, Germany made a massive invasion of Poland and bombed Warsaw at 6am, beginning World War II in Europe. German forces attacked Poland across all frontiers and its planes bombed Polish cities, including the capital, Warsaw – Britain and France prepare to declare war. And, on this date, the start of WWII – the service to 2,000 televisions ceased in Britain. There would be no more TV for seven years.

BBC News report along with a Timeline <— will open in a new tab for you.

1951 – The Premier supermarket opened in Earl’s Court, London; the first supermarket in Britain.

1974 – The SR-71 Blackbird (below) sets (and holds) the record for flying from New York to London: 1 hour 54 minutes and 56.4 seconds.

Lockheed

The Lockheed SR-71 is an advanced, long-range, Mach 3 strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft by the Lockheed Skunk Works. The SR-71 was unofficially named the Blackbird, and called the Habu by its crews. Clarence “Kelly” Johnson was responsible for many of the design’s innovative concepts. A defensive feature of the aircraft was its high-speed and operating altitude, whereby, if a surface-to-air missile launch were detected, standard evasive action was simply to accelerate. The SR-71 line was in service from 1964 to 1998, with 12 of the 32 aircraft being destroyed in accidents, though none were lost to enemy action.

1979 – The American space probe Pioneer 11 becomes the first spacecraft to visit Saturn when it passes the planet at a distance of 21,000 km.

1980 – Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope ends in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Terry Fox 1

Terrance Stanley “Terry” Fox, CC (July 28, 1958 – June 28, 1981) was a Canadian humanitarian, athlete, and cancer treatment activist. He became famous for the Marathon of Hope, a cross-Canada run to raise money for cancer research, which Fox ran with one prosthetic leg. He is considered one of Canada’s greatest heroes of the 20th century and is celebrated internationally every September as people participate in the Terry Fox Run, the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research.

Fox began by dipping his leg in the Atlantic Ocean at St. John’s, Newfoundland on April 12, 1980. He intended to dip it in the Pacific Ocean when he arrived in Victoria, British Columbia. He also filled two large bottles with Atlantic Ocean water; his plan was to keep one as a souvenir and pour the other one into the Pacific. He also intended to fill another jug of water with water from the Pacific Ocean. He was going to run about 42 km (26.2 miles) a day, the distance of a typical marathon. No one had ever done anything similar to the task Fox was undertaking.

Fox was unable to finish his run. His bone cancer had metastasized to his lungs: x-rays revealed that Terry’s right lung had a lump the size of a golf ball and his left lung had another lump the size of a lemon. He was forced to stop the run on September 1, 1980 just north-east of Thunder Bay, Ontario, after 143 days. He had run 5,373 km (3,339 miles, or around 23.3 miles per day) through Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario.

Terry Fox 2

Soon after Fox was forced to stop, the CTV television network organized a telethon in hopes of raising additional funds for the cause. Any celebrities within range of Toronto were invited to participate, and the event raised millions of dollars. Many of the guests paid tribute to Fox; TV actor Lee Majors called him “the real Six Million Dollar Man.”

In June 1981, Terry developed pneumonia, and on June 27 he went into a coma. He died on the 28th at 4:37 a.m., which was his favourite hour of running, a year after his legendary run, and exactly one month shy of his twenty-third birthday.
Terry’s large funeral was broadcast live on national television. He is buried in the Port Coquitlam cemetery, near his favourite lookout just outside the cemetery gates.

British singer/songwriter Rod Stewart’s 1981 album Tonight I’m Yours includes the song “Never Give Up On A Dream” (co-written with Bernie Taupin), a tribute to Terry’s Marathon of Hope.  Proceeds from the song went towards cancer research.

1981 – Garages in Britain began selling petrol in litres.

1985 – After 73 years the wreck of the liner ‘Titanic’ was found, by Dr. Robert Ballard.

2004 – The Beslan school hostage crisis begins when armed terrorists take hundreds of school children and adults hostage in the Russian town of Beslan in North Ossetia.

The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to as the Beslan school siege or Beslan massacre) began when a group of armed rebels, demanding an end to the Second Chechen War, took more than 1,100 people (including some 777 children) hostage on September 1, 2004, at School Number One (SNO) in the town of Beslan, North Ossetia-Alania, an autonomous republic in the North Caucasus region of the Russian Federation.

On the third day of the standoff, Russian security forces stormed the building using tanks, thermobaric rockets and other heavy weapons. A series of explosions shook the school, followed by a fire which engulfed the building and a chaotic gun battle between the hostage-takers and Russian security forces. Ultimately, at least 334 hostages were killed, including 186 children. Hundreds more were wounded or reported missing.

Chechen separatist warlord Shamil Basayev took responsibility for the hostage taking but blamed the outcome on the then Russian President Vladimir Putin. The tragedy led to security and political repercussions in Russia, most notably a series of government reforms consolidating power in the Kremlin and strengthening of the powers of President of Russia. As of 2008, there are many aspects of the crisis still in dispute, including how many militants were involved, their preparations, and whether some of them had escaped. Questions about the government’s management of the crisis have also persisted, including disinformation and censorship in news media, repressions of journalists who rushed to Beslan, the nature and content of negotiations with the militants, the responsibility for the bloody outcome, and the government’s use of possibly excessive force.

The School – A feature in Esquire Magazine.  –  from June 2006. This link is a great link, as not only does it include the whole story, in detail – but it also has video footage of this news item, as broadcast by CNN.

2006 – Luxembourg became the first country to complete the move to all digital television broadcasting.

Born on this Day

1854 –  Engelbert Humperdinck, German composer (d. 1921)

1875 –  Edgar Rice Burroughs, American writer (d. 1950)

1923 –  Rocky Marciano, American boxer (d. 1969)

1939 –  Lily Tomlin, American actress and comedian

1946 –  Barry Gibb, English singer (Bee Gees)

1950 –  Dr. Phil McGraw, American talk show host

1955 –  Bruce Foxton, English bassist (The Jam)

1957 –  Gloria Estefan, Cuban/American singer

Well then…. I hope you’ve learned something from that ↑ little lot that you can take out and share with the world …. or at the very least the person sat opposite you!

coffee cup

But … we haven’t finished yet.  🙂  I shared a little bit of playtime with you last week by giving you the link to a bubble popping game which had all those beautiful little noises as the bubbles popped.

Well this week, I have another bubble popper for you, but a slightly different one.  The aim is to fire little coloured balls from your ‘launcher’, at other coloured balls – of the same colour.  3 or more same coloured balls, all linked together means that section of balls will blow up, and you’ll bank points.

I play it not for points or to watch my best score, but simply just to have a little enjoyment and beat the game by blowing up all the balls and ending up with a completely blank screen after blowing all the balls to smithereens!

It’s called  Bubble Shooter.  <— click.  It will open up in another page for you.  Enjoy!

Wishing you a very happy Friday.  Hope your day is wonderful and that your weekend turns out to be a total joy.

September squidges from me to you …

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The Friday Post for 25th August 2017

Happy last Friday of August, this year!  There are exactly 122 days until Christmas.  There.  I said it.  I’ve put up with it being said over the last couple of weeks and I’ve finally said it myself.  It’s scary when I think about it.  So ….  I’m not going to.

Instead, let’s find out together about what happened on this day in history, shall we?

Ready?  OK, let’s go…

1768 – James Cook begins his first voyage.

1830 – Stephenson’s locomotive ‘Northumbrian’ took a trial run to prepare for the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Great Britain. . Actress Fanny Kemble rode on the footplate, the first woman to do so.

1835 The New York Sun perpetrates the Great Moon Hoax. “The Great Moon Hoax” was a series of six articles that were published in the New York Sun beginning on August 25, 1835 about the supposed discovery of life on the Moon. The discoveries were attributed falsely to Sir John Herschel, perhaps the best-known astronomer of his time.  You can read more about this here:  Wikipedia; Great Moon Hoax(it will open in another window for you.).

1910 – Yellow Cab is founded. The original Yellow Cab Company based in Chicago, Illinois is one of the largest taxicab companies.  Independent companies using that name (some with common heritage, some without) operate in many cities in a number of countries. Many firms operate with drivers as independent contractors. In some cities, they are operated as cooperatives owned by their drivers.

Related companies include The Hertz Corporation, Yellow Roadway and the Chicago Motor Coach Company, which was acquired by the Chicago Transit Authority.

1916 – The United States National Park Service is created. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service Organic Act in order to protect areas designated as national parks.

It is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior, which is a Cabinet Office of the executive branch, overseen by a Secretary nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Most of the direct management of the NPS is delegated by the Secretary to the National Park Service Director, who must now also be confirmed by the Senate. The NPS oversees 391 units, of which 58 are designated national parks.

1917 – The Order of the British Empire (OBE), and the Companion of Honour (CH), were awarded for the first time

1919 – The world’s first international daily air service began between London and Paris.

1940 – The RAF made the first air raid on Berlin.

1942 – The Duke of Kent, youngest brother of King George VI, was killed in a plane crash during a war mission to Iceland. He was the first member of the Royal family to be killed on active service.

1944 – Paris was liberated as the Germans surrendered. General Charles de Gaulle entered the capital of France after French and US troops forced a German surrender. BBC News Report plus video footage of the news

1967 – The leader of the American Nazi party, George Lincoln Rockwell, was shot and killed by a sniper at a shopping centre in Arlington, Virginia. George Rockwell was known as the “American Hitler”. Minutes after the shooting a man was arrested and charged with his murder. BBC News Report on the day

1986 – Britain staged its first street motor race – along roads around the centre of Birmingham – Englands second city (London being it’s first).

Born on this Day

1930 – Sean Connery, Scottish actor

1938 Frederick Forsyth, English author

1946 – Charles Ghigna (Father Goose), American poet and Children’s Author

1949 – Gene Simmons, Israeli-born musician (Kiss)

1954 – Elvis Costello, English musician

1958 – Tim Burton, American film director of (amongst many other things) two Batman films, Edward Scissorhands (1990), Ed Wood (1994), Sleepy Hollow (1999), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Corpse Bride, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, The Nightmare Before Christmas

1961 – Billy Ray Cyrus, American singer and actor

1970 – Claudia Schiffer, German model

And here’s a new addition to The Friday Post …

Thought for the Day

I had a conversation recently, with a much-loved friend who is a ‘non-believer’.  An Atheist.  Our conversation went from belief to non belief and back again, as we talked and chatted over our personal view points, until we came to death and what happens when you die.

Now my own experience of death is very limited.  I haven’t yet left this earth – I’ve only sat with others as they’ve done it (although I did technically ‘die’ on the operating table once – but that’s a story for another time).  But, it’s interesting that, when they ‘go’,  people who ‘die’ leave their bodies behind.

You see, to me, this suggests that existence cannot be a purely physical phenomenon.  What makes the difference between a human being and a human shell?

Breath.  Plain and simple.

And what drives that breath?

Well, some people call it heart, and some call it soul.  Some call it energy and some call it spirit.  But whatever it is – it has no weight, no mass, no size, and no visibility.  Therefore it has no time.

So in that case . . .  how can it ever die?

Like I’ve always believed:  …. you can’t die for the life of you.

There’s something to think about over the weekend, eh?  🙂

coffee cup

Well that about wraps up this weeks offerings of educationalmalisation . . .  EXCEPT …. every good school has play time.  Time out in the world, breathing in and out and having a little fun.  So … in order to accommodate this bit of play time, I’m sharing with you a game that I’ve played on and off for years.

Now I don’t know if I play it for the beautiful sounds of the bubbles popping – aww, so gentle and SO musical – or if I just try to beat the game.  (Because I do like a challenge).  However  here it is, and I encourage you to have a few plays with it until you get the feel of it and begin to enjoy it.  BOOMSHINE  is the game’s name.  (the link is the name).  When the page loads (in another window), simply click on ‘Play’ and the bubbles will load within that little screen.  They float about in various different colours and all you have to do is click somewhere on the screen where you’ll score the most bubbles bursting.  Each time you get over the required amount the screen back colour will change to a pale silver colour.  The opening page each time, will tell you how many bubbles you need to get – or how many you scored.  And … while the bubbles begin bursting, there is a little counter down in the left hand corner.  Do enjoy.

Have a truly lovely Friday and a wonderful weekend.

Sending squidges from my house to yours.

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Friday School:- like Sunday school but more entertaining.

Haaaappy Friday!

Well …. we made it through another week, so I think we’re doing OK.  None of us got run down by an Emu, or exploded for eating too many sweeties.  So we’ll score this week as a 10 out of 10.  Yes, I know that some of you have had gremlins creep into your week, and I know that at least one of you has had a day or two of feeling really rather miserable.  But … I’m here to put things on the right track again and do my job of not only Educationamalising you, but also going to fulfill my obligation to make you smile – even if you don’t want to!!!

So then … do you all have your pencils, crayons and books ready to take notes?  Then we shall begin .. ..  ..  ..

On this Day in History

1858 – First ascent of the Eiger.

The Eiger is a mountain in the Swiss Alps. The peak is mentioned in records dating back to the 13th century but there is no clear indication of how exactly the peak gained its name. The three mountains of the ridge are sometimes referred to as the Virgin (German: Jungfrau, lit. “Young Woman” – translates to “Virgin” or “Maiden”), the Monk (Mönch) and the Ogre (Eiger). The name has been linked to the Greek term akros, meaning “sharp” or “pointed”, but more commonly to the German eigen, meaning “characteristic”.

The first ascent of the Eiger was made by Swiss guides Christian Almer and Peter Bohren and Irishman Charles Barrington who climbed the west flank on August 11, 1858.

1909 – The first recorded use of the new emergency wireless signal SOS.

1929 – Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio.

External Link:
Babe Ruth.com – The Official Website of the Sultan of Swat

1934 – Federal prison opened at Alcatraz Island.

Alcatraz Island, sometimes informally referred to as simply Alcatraz or by its pop-culture name, The Rock, is a small island located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California, United States.

It served as a lighthouse, then a military fortification, then a military prison followed by a federal prison until 1963. It became a national recreation area in 1972 and received landmarking designations in 1976 and 1986.

Today, the island is a historic site operated by the National Park Service as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and is open to tours. Visitors can reach the island by ferry ride from Pier 33, near Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco.

External Link:
Alcatraz History

1941 – President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill  signed the Atlantic Charter, largely to demonstrate public solidarity between the Allies.

1942 – Great Britain’s Barnes Wallis patented his ‘bouncing bomb’, used successfully to destroy German dams in the 2nd World War.

1968 – The start of National Apple Week in England.  …  and ….  The Beatles launched their new record label, Apple.

1968 – The last steam passenger train service runs in Britain.

A selection of British Rail steam locomotives make the 120-mile journey from Liverpool to Carlisle and returns to Liverpool before having their fires dropped for the last time – this working was known as the Fifteen Guinea Special.

I’m thrilled to bits to have found a short film that was taken from the window of the Fifteen Guinea Special, showing how people came out of their houses and ran to the railway lines to watch this final last journey of this wonderful locomotive.

1971 – The Prime Minister, (of the day) Edward Heath, steered the British yachting team to victory in the Admiral’s Cup.

1975 – The British Government took ownership of British Leyland, the only major British-owned car company.

1982 – The notorious East End gangsters Ronnie and Reggie Kray were allowed out of prison for the funeral of their mother.

1999 – Up to 350m people throughout Europe and Asia witnessed the last total solar eclipse of the century.

2003 – A heat wave in Paris resulted in temperatures rising to 112°F (44° C), leaving about 144 people dead.

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We have reached the limit of my brain cell.  Please wait a moment while my user presses the re-set button.

~ ~  🚨  ~ ~

Now, although your edumacation for Friday School this week has been completed, please be aware that you will, at some point, be tested on these snippets of information, so if you skipped any dates you might want to go back and read them …. and even make notes in your book.  After all…  you don’t want to get a big F for FAIL in your test results.  Noooo.  Only those with passes over 8 (eight) will get an award [of a lollipop] and those with a score over 70 will get:  a lollypop, a tube of fruit Polo’s AND ….  a STICKER!!!

Ohhh ho ho ho (she laughs like Santa???) … we don’t skimp around here for prizes!  We go way over the top, as you can clearly see!

And finally ….  I have to fulfill my contract by making you laugh…  so get your chuckle muscles ready . . . . . .

(this is just a teensy bit rude … but only a little bit … however,  if you’re really easily offended then perhaps stop reading now)…

To celebrate their 7th anniversary, a man and his wife spend the weekend at an exclusive golf resort. He is a pretty good golfer, but she only just started. When they head down to the golf course after a lavish lunch and a bottle of champagne, they notice a beautiful mansion a couple of hundred yards behind the first hole.

“Let’s be extra careful, honey,” the husband says, “If we damage that house over there, it’ll cost us a fortune.”

The wife nods, tees off and – bang! – sends the ball right through the window of the mansion.

“Damn,” the husband says. “I told you to watch out for that house. Alright, let’s go up there, apologize and see what the damage is.”

They walk up to the house and knock on the door.

“Come on in,” a voice in the house says.

The couple open the door and enter the foyer. The living room is a mess. There are pieces of glass all over the floor and a broken bottle near the window. A man sits on the couch.

When the couple enter the room, he gets up and says, “Are you the guys who just broke my window?”

“Um, yeah,” the husband replies, “sorry about that.”

“Not at all, it’s me who has to thank you. I’m a genie and was trapped in that bottle for a thousand years. You’ve just released me. To show my gratitude, I’m allowed to grant each of you a wish.  But – I’ll require one favour in return.”

“Really? That’s great!” the husband says. “I want a million dollars a year for the rest of my life.”

“No problem – that’s the least I can do. And you, what do you want?” the genie asks, looking at the wife.

“I want a house in every country of the world,” the wife says.

The genie smiles. “Consider it done.”

“And what’s this favour we must grant in return, genie?” the husband asks.

“Well, since I’ve been trapped in that stupid bottle for the last thousand years, I haven’t ‘been’ with a woman for a very long time. My wish is to sleep with your wife.”

The husband scratches his head, looks at the wife and says, “Well, we did get a lot of money and all these houses, honey. So I guess I’m fine if it’s alright with you.”

The genie and the wife disappear in a room upstairs for an hour, while the husband stays in the living room.

When they are done, the genie rolls over, looks at the wife and asks, “How old exactly is your husband?”

“31,” she replies.

“And he still believes in genies? That’s amazing!”

Hey … don’t blame me, I’m just the deliverer of jokes.  I don’t make ’em up!

Well, that’s me done and dusted.  All that’s left for me to say is…..

Have a terrific Friday.  Share your smile with everyone.  Even if you don’t feel like smiling, try your best and you’ll soon see that having a smile plastered to your face actually does make you feel so much lighter and brighter inside.

Try it.  You’ve got nothing to lose!

Wishing you a wonderful weekend. 

Sending love and squidges from my corner here, where I’m sat., to your corner there, where you’re sat.

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The Friday Post (a post of 2 halves)

This week I thought we could do something different again.

We’ll firstly take a look over our shoulders and find out a few things which happened on this day (June the 23rd) in History.

And then …  we’ll have a bit of fun.  😉

So put on your seat belts, grab your coffee, we’ll be taking off  and travelling backwards in time to 1868  – where we’ll begin our trip of: …

On this Day in History

1868 – Christopher Latham Sholes  receives a patent for Type-Writer.  

Christopher Latham Sholes (February 14, 1819 – February 17, 1890) was an American inventor who invented the first practical typewriter and the QWERTY keyboard still in use today.

From their invention before 1870 through much of the 20th century, typewriters were indispensable tools for many professional writers and in business offices. By the end of the 1980s, word processor applications on personal computers had largely replaced the tasks previously accomplished with typewriters. Typewriters, however, remain popular in the developing world and among some niche markets, and for some office tasks.

1888 – Frederick Douglass is the first African-American nominated for U.S. president

Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, (born circa 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an American abolitionist, women’s suffragist, editor, orator, author, statesman and reformer. Called “The Sage of Anacostia” and “The Lion of Anacostia”, Douglass is one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history.

1894 – The International Olympic Committee is founded at the Sorbonne, Paris, at the initiative of Baron Pierre de Coubertin.

1917 – In a game against the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox pitcher Ernie Shore retires 26 batters in a row after replacing Babe Ruth, who had been ejected for punching the umpire.

1940 – World War II: German leader Adolf Hitler surveys newly defeated Paris in now occupied France.

1942 – World War II: The first selections for the gas chamber at Auschwitz take place on a train load of Jews from Paris.

1942 – World War II: Germany’s latest fighter, a Focke-Wulf FW190 is captured intact when it mistakenly lands at RAF Pembrey in Wales.

1943 – World War II: The British destroyers Eclipse and Laforey sink the Italian submarine Ascianghi in the Mediterranean after she torpedoes the cruiser HMS Newfoundland.

1972 – Watergate Scandal:

U.S. President Richard M. Nixon and White House chief of staff H. R. Haldeman are taped talking about using the Central Intelligence Agency to obstruct the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation into the Watergate break-ins.

1960 –  Eddie Cochran was at No.1 in the UK with the single ‘Three Steps To Heaven’.  The American singer had been killed 3 months earlier in a car crash while touring the UK.

1966 The Beatles had their tenth consecutive UK No.1 single with ‘Paperback Writer’ / ‘Rain.’ The track is marked by the boosted bass guitar sound throughout, partly in response to John Lennon demanding to know why the bass on a certain Wilson Pickett record far exceeded the bass on any Beatles records. It was also cut louder than any other Beatles record, due to a new piece of equipment used in the mastering process.

1970 – Chubby Checker was arrested in Niagara Falls after police discovered marijuana and other drugs in his car.

1993 – ‘Teflon Don’  jailed for life. New York crime boss, John Gotti was sentenced to life imprisonment with no chance of parole.

The head of the city’s largest Mafia family was convicted on 2 April for racketeering and five counts of murder – including the former head of the Gambino clan, Paul Castellano.

Gotti’s deputy, Frank Locascio, was also sentenced to life after being found guilty of similar charges. Both men were fined $250,000 (£134,500).

Several hundred Gotti-supporters had gathered outside the Brooklyn courtroom and an angry mob attempted to storm the building when the decision was announced.

Judge Leo Glasser’s sentencing brought to a close the long quest to convict the man nicknamed the “Teflon Don”.

Gotti, 51, had escaped repeated attempts by federal prosecutors throughout the 1980s to get charges to stick to him.

But police finally persuaded Salvatore Gravano – his former ally and right hand man – to testify against his boss in return for leniency.

John Gotti died of throat cancer in prison on 10th June 2002.  He was 61.

The Telfon Don’s son, John Gotti Jnr, took over the running of the Gambino family but was jailed in 1999 for bribery, extortion, gambling and fraud, and remains behind bars.

2016 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union, by 52% to 48%.

And,  as they say in the best Monty Python episodes:~ 

please click to watch and hear, it’s only 16 seconds long.

The following are actual questions from lawyers,  in a courtroom

And with some of those questions are the answers.  (some of these might need a moment of thinking about before the penny drops!).

Was that the same nose you broke as a child?

Now, doctor, isn’t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, in most cases he just passes quietly away and doesn’t know anything about it until the next morning?

Q: What happened then?
A: He told me, he says, ‘I have to kill you because you can identify me.’
Q: And did he kill you?

Was it you or your brother that was killed in the war?

The youngest son, the 20-year-old, how old is he?

Were you alone or by yourself?

Do you have any children or anything of that kind?

Q:  I show you exhibit 3 and ask you if you recognize that picture?
A:  That’s me.
Q:  Were you present when that picture was taken?

Were you present in court this morning when you were sworn in?

Q:  Now, Mrs. Johnson, how was your first marriage terminated?
A:  By death.
Q:  And by whose death was it terminated?

Q:  Do you know how far pregnant you are now?
A:  I’ll be three months on November 8.
Q:  Apparently, then, the date of conception was August 8?
A:  Yes.
Q:  What were you doing at that time?

Q:  Mrs. Jones, do you believe you are emotionally stable?
A:  I used to be.
Q:  How many times have you committed suicide?

So you were gone until you returned?

Q:  She had three children, right?
A:  Yes.
Q:  How many were boys?
A:  None.
Q:  Were there girls?

You don’t know what it was,  and you didn’t know what it looked like,  but can you describe it?

Q:  You say that the stairs went down to the basement?
A:  Yes.
Q:  And these stairs, did they go up also?

Q:  Have you lived in this town all your life?
A:  Not yet.

Q:  Do you recall approximately the time that you examined the body
A:  It was in the evening. The autopsy started about 8:30 pm.
Q:  And Mr. Edington was dead at the time, is that correct?
A:  No, you stupid ***,  he was sitting on the table wondering why I was doing an autopsy!

You couldn’t make it up could you?  And you know what’s even more fearful?  …  They walk among us!

Well… it’s Friday again.  They seem to come around quicker than ever.  I’ve been a day behind all week.  Tuesday was Monday.  Wednesday I was convinced was Tuesday … and so it went on all through the week.  Tsk.  It’s me.  Apparently I’m getting old, but I know I’m not because I’ve not increased in age since the age of 27, when I taught my two little girls who were so innocent and willing to listen to me back then,  that if anyone asked them how old their mommy was they were to say …  “My mummy’s ONLY 27!”.  And I continued to feed that delightful fact into their little heads until I was sure that they wouldn’t ever forget it.  And so,  as each year passed,  I remained, to my girls at least “Oooonly 27”.

I now get a birthday card from daughter No.2 every year which wishes me “Happy 27th Birthday Mom”.   Ahh,  I love her sooooo much.  😀

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Anyhoo…  I’ve sat here talking all this time and you’re wanting to drink up the last of your coffee in peace.  So, I shall stop yacking and let you go about your daily life.

Remember … today is Friday.  It’s permissible to smile BIG TIME on a Friday.  So please share your smile with the world,  for you are sooo gorgeous when you smile … SEE.THERE IT IS!!!  That smile lights up your whole face!  THE WHOLE ROOM IN FACT!!   Yeah … smile lots today because it really suits you.

Have a truly blessed day my beautiful, fabulous blogging friend.

Love and hugs ~

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Racing towards a Birthday

Guess who had a play in their craft room?  [grins]  I’m still not feeling 100%  and the mojo is still M.I.A.  and hiding somewhere in the craft room, but I’m still on the case and, with the help of our dog (an animal who can smell a biscuit crumb from 30 yards) I’m hoping to find that missing mojo very soon.

In the meantime I put together a Birthday card made with components from Hunkydory.

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It’s a 3D card which folds completely flat, so no need for a big box.  When opened up (into an X shape) the middle sections are hung from invisible thread (from my sewing threads box)  and the two dimpled gold rings, and the central disc picturing the racing car, spin around – in a slight breeze (from opening a door nearby), or if you blow very gently on them.

below are three photos which show each ‘quarter’ of the card so that you can see it from all sides.

So – finally,  one card done!  That’s a big move forward in the right direction.  I’m off again to the craft room this afternoon, so fingers crossed …  there might be something else to share on another day soon. [GRINS a very hopeful grin!]

Happy Wednesday the 18th of January!  Did you know that … on this day in History:-

  • 1644 –  Perplexed Pilgrims in Boston reported America’s 1st UFO sighting
  • 1788 –  The first elements of the First Fleet carrying 736 convicts from England to Australia arrives at Botany Bay to set up a penal colony
  • 1896 – 1st demonstration of an X-ray machine in US.
  • 1919 – Bentley Motors Limited is founded
  • 1944 –  The Metropolitan Opera House in New York City hosts a jazz concert for the first time. The performers were Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, Artie Shaw, Roy Eldridge and Jack Teagarden.
  • 1964 – Beatles 1st appear on Billboard Chart (I Want to Hold Your Hand-#35)
  • 1967 – ‘Boston Strangler’ sentenced to life
  • 1973 – John Cleese’s final episode on “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” on BBC TV
  • 1980 – Pink Floyd’s “Wall” hits #1
  • 1981 – Wendy O Williams arrested in Milwaukee for on-stage obscenity
  • 1991 – Longest tennis match at the Australian Open, Boris Becker beats Italy’s Omar Camporese in 5 hours & 11 mins

That’s just a little handful of things which happened on this day in history.  Wikipedia    have a huuuge list, and if you’d like to read more about todays date simply click on the name.

Hope your week is off to a good start and that the weather is treating you kindly, wherever you are on the planet.  But … if the weather is fowl and you have bills to pay you’d rather not be paying … just think … you’re in a better place than you could be.  So please look at what you’re blessed with, and have a truly lovely,  blessed,  rest of your day.

Sending squidges from me in my corner to you in yours.

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