The Friday Post ~ 1st September 2017

Happy 1st September and,   after me I want you to say the following out loud  … ready?  WHITE RABBITS.   Said it?  Good.  You see, this is something I was taught by my grandparents to say on the very first day of any and every month.  It’s kind of good luck charm.  Something which would ensure that bad luck passed by you and only good luck came into your life.

Now you can scoff and say it’s rubbish … but hey,  it’s just two little words. What have you got to lose?

Today is in fact a very special day because…   September 1st  is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.  There are 121 days remaining until the end of the year.  This date is slightly more likely to fall on a Tuesday, Thursday or Saturday (58 in 400 years each) than on Sunday or Monday (57), and slightly less likely to occur on a Wednesday or Friday (56).  I think we should have a cake of some sort, to celebrate.  Shall we get our baking tins out and do something wonderful with them?

Right then … it’s Friday so that means it’s ‘Further Your Edumacation Day!’.  Do you have your pens, pencils and crayons ready?  Ok … let’s go then!

On this Day in History.

1159 Pope Adrian IV, (Nicholas Breakspeare), the only English pope, died.

1752 – The Liberty Bell arrives in Philadelphia. The Liberty Bell, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is a bell that has served as one of the most prominent symbols of the American Revolutionary War. It is a familiar symbol of independence within the United States and has been described as an icon of liberty and justice.

You can learn more here:  US History – Liberty Bell.

1865 – In Great Britain – Joseph Lister performed the first antiseptic surgery.

1886 – The Severn Tunnel, (railway tunnel) between England and Wales, was opened for goods traffic

1920 – The Fountain of Time opens as a tribute to the 100 years of peace between the United States and Great Britain following the Treaty of Ghent.

The Treaty of Ghent was the peace treaty that ended the War of 1812 between the United States of America and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Both sides signed it on December 24, 1814, in the city of Ghent, Belgium.

1939 – At dawn on 1st September, Germany made a massive invasion of Poland and bombed Warsaw at 6am, beginning World War II in Europe. German forces attacked Poland across all frontiers and its planes bombed Polish cities, including the capital, Warsaw – Britain and France prepare to declare war. And, on this date, the start of WWII – the service to 2,000 televisions ceased in Britain. There would be no more TV for seven years.

BBC News report along with a Timeline <— will open in a new tab for you.

1951 – The Premier supermarket opened in Earl’s Court, London; the first supermarket in Britain.

1974 – The SR-71 Blackbird (below) sets (and holds) the record for flying from New York to London: 1 hour 54 minutes and 56.4 seconds.

Lockheed

The Lockheed SR-71 is an advanced, long-range, Mach 3 strategic reconnaissance aircraft developed from the Lockheed A-12 and YF-12A aircraft by the Lockheed Skunk Works. The SR-71 was unofficially named the Blackbird, and called the Habu by its crews. Clarence “Kelly” Johnson was responsible for many of the design’s innovative concepts. A defensive feature of the aircraft was its high-speed and operating altitude, whereby, if a surface-to-air missile launch were detected, standard evasive action was simply to accelerate. The SR-71 line was in service from 1964 to 1998, with 12 of the 32 aircraft being destroyed in accidents, though none were lost to enemy action.

1979 – The American space probe Pioneer 11 becomes the first spacecraft to visit Saturn when it passes the planet at a distance of 21,000 km.

1980 – Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope ends in Thunder Bay, Ontario.

Terry Fox 1

Terrance Stanley “Terry” Fox, CC (July 28, 1958 – June 28, 1981) was a Canadian humanitarian, athlete, and cancer treatment activist. He became famous for the Marathon of Hope, a cross-Canada run to raise money for cancer research, which Fox ran with one prosthetic leg. He is considered one of Canada’s greatest heroes of the 20th century and is celebrated internationally every September as people participate in the Terry Fox Run, the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research.

Fox began by dipping his leg in the Atlantic Ocean at St. John’s, Newfoundland on April 12, 1980. He intended to dip it in the Pacific Ocean when he arrived in Victoria, British Columbia. He also filled two large bottles with Atlantic Ocean water; his plan was to keep one as a souvenir and pour the other one into the Pacific. He also intended to fill another jug of water with water from the Pacific Ocean. He was going to run about 42 km (26.2 miles) a day, the distance of a typical marathon. No one had ever done anything similar to the task Fox was undertaking.

Fox was unable to finish his run. His bone cancer had metastasized to his lungs: x-rays revealed that Terry’s right lung had a lump the size of a golf ball and his left lung had another lump the size of a lemon. He was forced to stop the run on September 1, 1980 just north-east of Thunder Bay, Ontario, after 143 days. He had run 5,373 km (3,339 miles, or around 23.3 miles per day) through Newfoundland, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, New Brunswick, Quebec, and Ontario.

Terry Fox 2

Soon after Fox was forced to stop, the CTV television network organized a telethon in hopes of raising additional funds for the cause. Any celebrities within range of Toronto were invited to participate, and the event raised millions of dollars. Many of the guests paid tribute to Fox; TV actor Lee Majors called him “the real Six Million Dollar Man.”

In June 1981, Terry developed pneumonia, and on June 27 he went into a coma. He died on the 28th at 4:37 a.m., which was his favourite hour of running, a year after his legendary run, and exactly one month shy of his twenty-third birthday.
Terry’s large funeral was broadcast live on national television. He is buried in the Port Coquitlam cemetery, near his favourite lookout just outside the cemetery gates.

British singer/songwriter Rod Stewart’s 1981 album Tonight I’m Yours includes the song “Never Give Up On A Dream” (co-written with Bernie Taupin), a tribute to Terry’s Marathon of Hope.  Proceeds from the song went towards cancer research.

1981 – Garages in Britain began selling petrol in litres.

1985 – After 73 years the wreck of the liner ‘Titanic’ was found, by Dr. Robert Ballard.

2004 – The Beslan school hostage crisis begins when armed terrorists take hundreds of school children and adults hostage in the Russian town of Beslan in North Ossetia.

The Beslan school hostage crisis (also referred to as the Beslan school siege or Beslan massacre) began when a group of armed rebels, demanding an end to the Second Chechen War, took more than 1,100 people (including some 777 children) hostage on September 1, 2004, at School Number One (SNO) in the town of Beslan, North Ossetia-Alania, an autonomous republic in the North Caucasus region of the Russian Federation.

On the third day of the standoff, Russian security forces stormed the building using tanks, thermobaric rockets and other heavy weapons. A series of explosions shook the school, followed by a fire which engulfed the building and a chaotic gun battle between the hostage-takers and Russian security forces. Ultimately, at least 334 hostages were killed, including 186 children. Hundreds more were wounded or reported missing.

Chechen separatist warlord Shamil Basayev took responsibility for the hostage taking but blamed the outcome on the then Russian President Vladimir Putin. The tragedy led to security and political repercussions in Russia, most notably a series of government reforms consolidating power in the Kremlin and strengthening of the powers of President of Russia. As of 2008, there are many aspects of the crisis still in dispute, including how many militants were involved, their preparations, and whether some of them had escaped. Questions about the government’s management of the crisis have also persisted, including disinformation and censorship in news media, repressions of journalists who rushed to Beslan, the nature and content of negotiations with the militants, the responsibility for the bloody outcome, and the government’s use of possibly excessive force.

The School – A feature in Esquire Magazine.  –  from June 2006. This link is a great link, as not only does it include the whole story, in detail – but it also has video footage of this news item, as broadcast by CNN.

2006 – Luxembourg became the first country to complete the move to all digital television broadcasting.

Born on this Day

1854 –  Engelbert Humperdinck, German composer (d. 1921)

1875 –  Edgar Rice Burroughs, American writer (d. 1950)

1923 –  Rocky Marciano, American boxer (d. 1969)

1939 –  Lily Tomlin, American actress and comedian

1946 –  Barry Gibb, English singer (Bee Gees)

1950 –  Dr. Phil McGraw, American talk show host

1955 –  Bruce Foxton, English bassist (The Jam)

1957 –  Gloria Estefan, Cuban/American singer

Well then…. I hope you’ve learned something from that ↑ little lot that you can take out and share with the world …. or at the very least the person sat opposite you!

coffee cup

But … we haven’t finished yet.  🙂  I shared a little bit of playtime with you last week by giving you the link to a bubble popping game which had all those beautiful little noises as the bubbles popped.

Well this week, I have another bubble popper for you, but a slightly different one.  The aim is to fire little coloured balls from your ‘launcher’, at other coloured balls – of the same colour.  3 or more same coloured balls, all linked together means that section of balls will blow up, and you’ll bank points.

I play it not for points or to watch my best score, but simply just to have a little enjoyment and beat the game by blowing up all the balls and ending up with a completely blank screen after blowing all the balls to smithereens!

It’s called  Bubble Shooter.  <— click.  It will open up in another page for you.  Enjoy!

Wishing you a very happy Friday.  Hope your day is wonderful and that your weekend turns out to be a total joy.

September squidges from me to you …

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The Friday Post for 25th August 2017

Happy last Friday of August, this year!  There are exactly 122 days until Christmas.  There.  I said it.  I’ve put up with it being said over the last couple of weeks and I’ve finally said it myself.  It’s scary when I think about it.  So ….  I’m not going to.

Instead, let’s find out together about what happened on this day in history, shall we?

Ready?  OK, let’s go…

1768 – James Cook begins his first voyage.

1830 – Stephenson’s locomotive ‘Northumbrian’ took a trial run to prepare for the opening of the Liverpool and Manchester Railway, Great Britain. . Actress Fanny Kemble rode on the footplate, the first woman to do so.

1835 The New York Sun perpetrates the Great Moon Hoax. “The Great Moon Hoax” was a series of six articles that were published in the New York Sun beginning on August 25, 1835 about the supposed discovery of life on the Moon. The discoveries were attributed falsely to Sir John Herschel, perhaps the best-known astronomer of his time.  You can read more about this here:  Wikipedia; Great Moon Hoax(it will open in another window for you.).

1910 – Yellow Cab is founded. The original Yellow Cab Company based in Chicago, Illinois is one of the largest taxicab companies.  Independent companies using that name (some with common heritage, some without) operate in many cities in a number of countries. Many firms operate with drivers as independent contractors. In some cities, they are operated as cooperatives owned by their drivers.

Related companies include The Hertz Corporation, Yellow Roadway and the Chicago Motor Coach Company, which was acquired by the Chicago Transit Authority.

1916 – The United States National Park Service is created. The National Park Service (NPS) is the United States federal agency that manages all National Parks, many National Monuments, and other conservation and historical properties with various title designations. It was created on August 25, 1916, by Congress through the National Park Service Organic Act in order to protect areas designated as national parks.

It is an agency of the United States Department of the Interior, which is a Cabinet Office of the executive branch, overseen by a Secretary nominated by the President and confirmed by the Senate. Most of the direct management of the NPS is delegated by the Secretary to the National Park Service Director, who must now also be confirmed by the Senate. The NPS oversees 391 units, of which 58 are designated national parks.

1917 – The Order of the British Empire (OBE), and the Companion of Honour (CH), were awarded for the first time

1919 – The world’s first international daily air service began between London and Paris.

1940 – The RAF made the first air raid on Berlin.

1942 – The Duke of Kent, youngest brother of King George VI, was killed in a plane crash during a war mission to Iceland. He was the first member of the Royal family to be killed on active service.

1944 – Paris was liberated as the Germans surrendered. General Charles de Gaulle entered the capital of France after French and US troops forced a German surrender. BBC News Report plus video footage of the news

1967 – The leader of the American Nazi party, George Lincoln Rockwell, was shot and killed by a sniper at a shopping centre in Arlington, Virginia. George Rockwell was known as the “American Hitler”. Minutes after the shooting a man was arrested and charged with his murder. BBC News Report on the day

1986 – Britain staged its first street motor race – along roads around the centre of Birmingham – Englands second city (London being it’s first).

Born on this Day

1930 – Sean Connery, Scottish actor

1938 Frederick Forsyth, English author

1946 – Charles Ghigna (Father Goose), American poet and Children’s Author

1949 – Gene Simmons, Israeli-born musician (Kiss)

1954 – Elvis Costello, English musician

1958 – Tim Burton, American film director of (amongst many other things) two Batman films, Edward Scissorhands (1990), Ed Wood (1994), Sleepy Hollow (1999), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and Corpse Bride, Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, The Nightmare Before Christmas

1961 – Billy Ray Cyrus, American singer and actor

1970 – Claudia Schiffer, German model

And here’s a new addition to The Friday Post …

Thought for the Day

I had a conversation recently, with a much-loved friend who is a ‘non-believer’.  An Atheist.  Our conversation went from belief to non belief and back again, as we talked and chatted over our personal view points, until we came to death and what happens when you die.

Now my own experience of death is very limited.  I haven’t yet left this earth – I’ve only sat with others as they’ve done it (although I did technically ‘die’ on the operating table once – but that’s a story for another time).  But, it’s interesting that, when they ‘go’,  people who ‘die’ leave their bodies behind.

You see, to me, this suggests that existence cannot be a purely physical phenomenon.  What makes the difference between a human being and a human shell?

Breath.  Plain and simple.

And what drives that breath?

Well, some people call it heart, and some call it soul.  Some call it energy and some call it spirit.  But whatever it is – it has no weight, no mass, no size, and no visibility.  Therefore it has no time.

So in that case . . .  how can it ever die?

Like I’ve always believed:  …. you can’t die for the life of you.

There’s something to think about over the weekend, eh?  🙂

coffee cup

Well that about wraps up this weeks offerings of educationalmalisation . . .  EXCEPT …. every good school has play time.  Time out in the world, breathing in and out and having a little fun.  So … in order to accommodate this bit of play time, I’m sharing with you a game that I’ve played on and off for years.

Now I don’t know if I play it for the beautiful sounds of the bubbles popping – aww, so gentle and SO musical – or if I just try to beat the game.  (Because I do like a challenge).  However  here it is, and I encourage you to have a few plays with it until you get the feel of it and begin to enjoy it.  BOOMSHINE  is the game’s name.  (the link is the name).  When the page loads (in another window), simply click on ‘Play’ and the bubbles will load within that little screen.  They float about in various different colours and all you have to do is click somewhere on the screen where you’ll score the most bubbles bursting.  Each time you get over the required amount the screen back colour will change to a pale silver colour.  The opening page each time, will tell you how many bubbles you need to get – or how many you scored.  And … while the bubbles begin bursting, there is a little counter down in the left hand corner.  Do enjoy.

Have a truly lovely Friday and a wonderful weekend.

Sending squidges from my house to yours.

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Friday School:- like Sunday school but more entertaining.

Haaaappy Friday!

Well …. we made it through another week, so I think we’re doing OK.  None of us got run down by an Emu, or exploded for eating too many sweeties.  So we’ll score this week as a 10 out of 10.  Yes, I know that some of you have had gremlins creep into your week, and I know that at least one of you has had a day or two of feeling really rather miserable.  But … I’m here to put things on the right track again and do my job of not only Educationamalising you, but also going to fulfill my obligation to make you smile – even if you don’t want to!!!

So then … do you all have your pencils, crayons and books ready to take notes?  Then we shall begin .. ..  ..  ..

On this Day in History

1858 – First ascent of the Eiger.

The Eiger is a mountain in the Swiss Alps. The peak is mentioned in records dating back to the 13th century but there is no clear indication of how exactly the peak gained its name. The three mountains of the ridge are sometimes referred to as the Virgin (German: Jungfrau, lit. “Young Woman” – translates to “Virgin” or “Maiden”), the Monk (Mönch) and the Ogre (Eiger). The name has been linked to the Greek term akros, meaning “sharp” or “pointed”, but more commonly to the German eigen, meaning “characteristic”.

The first ascent of the Eiger was made by Swiss guides Christian Almer and Peter Bohren and Irishman Charles Barrington who climbed the west flank on August 11, 1858.

1909 – The first recorded use of the new emergency wireless signal SOS.

1929 – Babe Ruth becomes the first baseball player to hit 500 home runs in his career with a home run at League Park in Cleveland, Ohio.

External Link:
Babe Ruth.com – The Official Website of the Sultan of Swat

1934 – Federal prison opened at Alcatraz Island.

Alcatraz Island, sometimes informally referred to as simply Alcatraz or by its pop-culture name, The Rock, is a small island located in the middle of San Francisco Bay in California, United States.

It served as a lighthouse, then a military fortification, then a military prison followed by a federal prison until 1963. It became a national recreation area in 1972 and received landmarking designations in 1976 and 1986.

Today, the island is a historic site operated by the National Park Service as part of the Golden Gate National Recreation Area and is open to tours. Visitors can reach the island by ferry ride from Pier 33, near Fisherman’s Wharf in San Francisco.

External Link:
Alcatraz History

1941 – President Roosevelt and Winston Churchill  signed the Atlantic Charter, largely to demonstrate public solidarity between the Allies.

1942 – Great Britain’s Barnes Wallis patented his ‘bouncing bomb’, used successfully to destroy German dams in the 2nd World War.

1968 – The start of National Apple Week in England.  …  and ….  The Beatles launched their new record label, Apple.

1968 – The last steam passenger train service runs in Britain.

A selection of British Rail steam locomotives make the 120-mile journey from Liverpool to Carlisle and returns to Liverpool before having their fires dropped for the last time – this working was known as the Fifteen Guinea Special.

I’m thrilled to bits to have found a short film that was taken from the window of the Fifteen Guinea Special, showing how people came out of their houses and ran to the railway lines to watch this final last journey of this wonderful locomotive.

1971 – The Prime Minister, (of the day) Edward Heath, steered the British yachting team to victory in the Admiral’s Cup.

1975 – The British Government took ownership of British Leyland, the only major British-owned car company.

1982 – The notorious East End gangsters Ronnie and Reggie Kray were allowed out of prison for the funeral of their mother.

1999 – Up to 350m people throughout Europe and Asia witnessed the last total solar eclipse of the century.

2003 – A heat wave in Paris resulted in temperatures rising to 112°F (44° C), leaving about 144 people dead.

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We have reached the limit of my brain cell.  Please wait a moment while my user presses the re-set button.

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Now, although your edumacation for Friday School this week has been completed, please be aware that you will, at some point, be tested on these snippets of information, so if you skipped any dates you might want to go back and read them …. and even make notes in your book.  After all…  you don’t want to get a big F for FAIL in your test results.  Noooo.  Only those with passes over 8 (eight) will get an award [of a lollipop] and those with a score over 70 will get:  a lollypop, a tube of fruit Polo’s AND ….  a STICKER!!!

Ohhh ho ho ho (she laughs like Santa???) … we don’t skimp around here for prizes!  We go way over the top, as you can clearly see!

And finally ….  I have to fulfill my contract by making you laugh…  so get your chuckle muscles ready . . . . . .

(this is just a teensy bit rude … but only a little bit … however,  if you’re really easily offended then perhaps stop reading now)…

To celebrate their 7th anniversary, a man and his wife spend the weekend at an exclusive golf resort. He is a pretty good golfer, but she only just started. When they head down to the golf course after a lavish lunch and a bottle of champagne, they notice a beautiful mansion a couple of hundred yards behind the first hole.

“Let’s be extra careful, honey,” the husband says, “If we damage that house over there, it’ll cost us a fortune.”

The wife nods, tees off and – bang! – sends the ball right through the window of the mansion.

“Damn,” the husband says. “I told you to watch out for that house. Alright, let’s go up there, apologize and see what the damage is.”

They walk up to the house and knock on the door.

“Come on in,” a voice in the house says.

The couple open the door and enter the foyer. The living room is a mess. There are pieces of glass all over the floor and a broken bottle near the window. A man sits on the couch.

When the couple enter the room, he gets up and says, “Are you the guys who just broke my window?”

“Um, yeah,” the husband replies, “sorry about that.”

“Not at all, it’s me who has to thank you. I’m a genie and was trapped in that bottle for a thousand years. You’ve just released me. To show my gratitude, I’m allowed to grant each of you a wish.  But – I’ll require one favour in return.”

“Really? That’s great!” the husband says. “I want a million dollars a year for the rest of my life.”

“No problem – that’s the least I can do. And you, what do you want?” the genie asks, looking at the wife.

“I want a house in every country of the world,” the wife says.

The genie smiles. “Consider it done.”

“And what’s this favour we must grant in return, genie?” the husband asks.

“Well, since I’ve been trapped in that stupid bottle for the last thousand years, I haven’t ‘been’ with a woman for a very long time. My wish is to sleep with your wife.”

The husband scratches his head, looks at the wife and says, “Well, we did get a lot of money and all these houses, honey. So I guess I’m fine if it’s alright with you.”

The genie and the wife disappear in a room upstairs for an hour, while the husband stays in the living room.

When they are done, the genie rolls over, looks at the wife and asks, “How old exactly is your husband?”

“31,” she replies.

“And he still believes in genies? That’s amazing!”

Hey … don’t blame me, I’m just the deliverer of jokes.  I don’t make ’em up!

Well, that’s me done and dusted.  All that’s left for me to say is…..

Have a terrific Friday.  Share your smile with everyone.  Even if you don’t feel like smiling, try your best and you’ll soon see that having a smile plastered to your face actually does make you feel so much lighter and brighter inside.

Try it.  You’ve got nothing to lose!

Wishing you a wonderful weekend. 

Sending love and squidges from my corner here, where I’m sat., to your corner there, where you’re sat.

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The Friday Post (a post of 2 halves)

This week I thought we could do something different again.

We’ll firstly take a look over our shoulders and find out a few things which happened on this day (June the 23rd) in History.

And then …  we’ll have a bit of fun.  😉

So put on your seat belts, grab your coffee, we’ll be taking off  and travelling backwards in time to 1868  – where we’ll begin our trip of: …

On this Day in History

1868 – Christopher Latham Sholes  receives a patent for Type-Writer.  

Christopher Latham Sholes (February 14, 1819 – February 17, 1890) was an American inventor who invented the first practical typewriter and the QWERTY keyboard still in use today.

From their invention before 1870 through much of the 20th century, typewriters were indispensable tools for many professional writers and in business offices. By the end of the 1980s, word processor applications on personal computers had largely replaced the tasks previously accomplished with typewriters. Typewriters, however, remain popular in the developing world and among some niche markets, and for some office tasks.

1888 – Frederick Douglass is the first African-American nominated for U.S. president

Frederick Douglass (born Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey, (born circa 1818 – February 20, 1895) was an American abolitionist, women’s suffragist, editor, orator, author, statesman and reformer. Called “The Sage of Anacostia” and “The Lion of Anacostia”, Douglass is one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history.

1894 – The International Olympic Committee is founded at the Sorbonne, Paris, at the initiative of Baron Pierre de Coubertin.

1917 – In a game against the Washington Senators, Boston Red Sox pitcher Ernie Shore retires 26 batters in a row after replacing Babe Ruth, who had been ejected for punching the umpire.

1940 – World War II: German leader Adolf Hitler surveys newly defeated Paris in now occupied France.

1942 – World War II: The first selections for the gas chamber at Auschwitz take place on a train load of Jews from Paris.

1942 – World War II: Germany’s latest fighter, a Focke-Wulf FW190 is captured intact when it mistakenly lands at RAF Pembrey in Wales.

1943 – World War II: The British destroyers Eclipse and Laforey sink the Italian submarine Ascianghi in the Mediterranean after she torpedoes the cruiser HMS Newfoundland.

1972 – Watergate Scandal:

U.S. President Richard M. Nixon and White House chief of staff H. R. Haldeman are taped talking about using the Central Intelligence Agency to obstruct the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s investigation into the Watergate break-ins.

1960 –  Eddie Cochran was at No.1 in the UK with the single ‘Three Steps To Heaven’.  The American singer had been killed 3 months earlier in a car crash while touring the UK.

1966 The Beatles had their tenth consecutive UK No.1 single with ‘Paperback Writer’ / ‘Rain.’ The track is marked by the boosted bass guitar sound throughout, partly in response to John Lennon demanding to know why the bass on a certain Wilson Pickett record far exceeded the bass on any Beatles records. It was also cut louder than any other Beatles record, due to a new piece of equipment used in the mastering process.

1970 – Chubby Checker was arrested in Niagara Falls after police discovered marijuana and other drugs in his car.

1993 – ‘Teflon Don’  jailed for life. New York crime boss, John Gotti was sentenced to life imprisonment with no chance of parole.

The head of the city’s largest Mafia family was convicted on 2 April for racketeering and five counts of murder – including the former head of the Gambino clan, Paul Castellano.

Gotti’s deputy, Frank Locascio, was also sentenced to life after being found guilty of similar charges. Both men were fined $250,000 (£134,500).

Several hundred Gotti-supporters had gathered outside the Brooklyn courtroom and an angry mob attempted to storm the building when the decision was announced.

Judge Leo Glasser’s sentencing brought to a close the long quest to convict the man nicknamed the “Teflon Don”.

Gotti, 51, had escaped repeated attempts by federal prosecutors throughout the 1980s to get charges to stick to him.

But police finally persuaded Salvatore Gravano – his former ally and right hand man – to testify against his boss in return for leniency.

John Gotti died of throat cancer in prison on 10th June 2002.  He was 61.

The Telfon Don’s son, John Gotti Jnr, took over the running of the Gambino family but was jailed in 1999 for bribery, extortion, gambling and fraud, and remains behind bars.

2016 – The United Kingdom votes in a referendum to leave the European Union, by 52% to 48%.

And,  as they say in the best Monty Python episodes:~ 

please click to watch and hear, it’s only 16 seconds long.

The following are actual questions from lawyers,  in a courtroom

And with some of those questions are the answers.  (some of these might need a moment of thinking about before the penny drops!).

Was that the same nose you broke as a child?

Now, doctor, isn’t it true that when a person dies in his sleep, in most cases he just passes quietly away and doesn’t know anything about it until the next morning?

Q: What happened then?
A: He told me, he says, ‘I have to kill you because you can identify me.’
Q: And did he kill you?

Was it you or your brother that was killed in the war?

The youngest son, the 20-year-old, how old is he?

Were you alone or by yourself?

Do you have any children or anything of that kind?

Q:  I show you exhibit 3 and ask you if you recognize that picture?
A:  That’s me.
Q:  Were you present when that picture was taken?

Were you present in court this morning when you were sworn in?

Q:  Now, Mrs. Johnson, how was your first marriage terminated?
A:  By death.
Q:  And by whose death was it terminated?

Q:  Do you know how far pregnant you are now?
A:  I’ll be three months on November 8.
Q:  Apparently, then, the date of conception was August 8?
A:  Yes.
Q:  What were you doing at that time?

Q:  Mrs. Jones, do you believe you are emotionally stable?
A:  I used to be.
Q:  How many times have you committed suicide?

So you were gone until you returned?

Q:  She had three children, right?
A:  Yes.
Q:  How many were boys?
A:  None.
Q:  Were there girls?

You don’t know what it was,  and you didn’t know what it looked like,  but can you describe it?

Q:  You say that the stairs went down to the basement?
A:  Yes.
Q:  And these stairs, did they go up also?

Q:  Have you lived in this town all your life?
A:  Not yet.

Q:  Do you recall approximately the time that you examined the body
A:  It was in the evening. The autopsy started about 8:30 pm.
Q:  And Mr. Edington was dead at the time, is that correct?
A:  No, you stupid ***,  he was sitting on the table wondering why I was doing an autopsy!

You couldn’t make it up could you?  And you know what’s even more fearful?  …  They walk among us!

Well… it’s Friday again.  They seem to come around quicker than ever.  I’ve been a day behind all week.  Tuesday was Monday.  Wednesday I was convinced was Tuesday … and so it went on all through the week.  Tsk.  It’s me.  Apparently I’m getting old, but I know I’m not because I’ve not increased in age since the age of 27, when I taught my two little girls who were so innocent and willing to listen to me back then,  that if anyone asked them how old their mommy was they were to say …  “My mummy’s ONLY 27!”.  And I continued to feed that delightful fact into their little heads until I was sure that they wouldn’t ever forget it.  And so,  as each year passed,  I remained, to my girls at least “Oooonly 27”.

I now get a birthday card from daughter No.2 every year which wishes me “Happy 27th Birthday Mom”.   Ahh,  I love her sooooo much.  😀

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Anyhoo…  I’ve sat here talking all this time and you’re wanting to drink up the last of your coffee in peace.  So, I shall stop yacking and let you go about your daily life.

Remember … today is Friday.  It’s permissible to smile BIG TIME on a Friday.  So please share your smile with the world,  for you are sooo gorgeous when you smile … SEE.THERE IT IS!!!  That smile lights up your whole face!  THE WHOLE ROOM IN FACT!!   Yeah … smile lots today because it really suits you.

Have a truly blessed day my beautiful, fabulous blogging friend.

Love and hugs ~

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Racing towards a Birthday

Guess who had a play in their craft room?  [grins]  I’m still not feeling 100%  and the mojo is still M.I.A.  and hiding somewhere in the craft room, but I’m still on the case and, with the help of our dog (an animal who can smell a biscuit crumb from 30 yards) I’m hoping to find that missing mojo very soon.

In the meantime I put together a Birthday card made with components from Hunkydory.

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It’s a 3D card which folds completely flat, so no need for a big box.  When opened up (into an X shape) the middle sections are hung from invisible thread (from my sewing threads box)  and the two dimpled gold rings, and the central disc picturing the racing car, spin around – in a slight breeze (from opening a door nearby), or if you blow very gently on them.

below are three photos which show each ‘quarter’ of the card so that you can see it from all sides.

So – finally,  one card done!  That’s a big move forward in the right direction.  I’m off again to the craft room this afternoon, so fingers crossed …  there might be something else to share on another day soon. [GRINS a very hopeful grin!]

Happy Wednesday the 18th of January!  Did you know that … on this day in History:-

  • 1644 –  Perplexed Pilgrims in Boston reported America’s 1st UFO sighting
  • 1788 –  The first elements of the First Fleet carrying 736 convicts from England to Australia arrives at Botany Bay to set up a penal colony
  • 1896 – 1st demonstration of an X-ray machine in US.
  • 1919 – Bentley Motors Limited is founded
  • 1944 –  The Metropolitan Opera House in New York City hosts a jazz concert for the first time. The performers were Louis Armstrong, Benny Goodman, Lionel Hampton, Artie Shaw, Roy Eldridge and Jack Teagarden.
  • 1964 – Beatles 1st appear on Billboard Chart (I Want to Hold Your Hand-#35)
  • 1967 – ‘Boston Strangler’ sentenced to life
  • 1973 – John Cleese’s final episode on “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” on BBC TV
  • 1980 – Pink Floyd’s “Wall” hits #1
  • 1981 – Wendy O Williams arrested in Milwaukee for on-stage obscenity
  • 1991 – Longest tennis match at the Australian Open, Boris Becker beats Italy’s Omar Camporese in 5 hours & 11 mins

That’s just a little handful of things which happened on this day in history.  Wikipedia    have a huuuge list, and if you’d like to read more about todays date simply click on the name.

Hope your week is off to a good start and that the weather is treating you kindly, wherever you are on the planet.  But … if the weather is fowl and you have bills to pay you’d rather not be paying … just think … you’re in a better place than you could be.  So please look at what you’re blessed with, and have a truly lovely,  blessed,  rest of your day.

Sending squidges from me in my corner to you in yours.

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