The Friday Post ~ History of Events on 16th March

Good Morning,  and a very Happy Friday to one and all.  We are, today, 75 days into 2018 – which means that there’s 283 till Christmas.  Now don’t you feel better now you’ve had an early warning about this special date rushing towards us?  You’ll be able to miss the crush of shoppers in December, simply because you have a lovely blogging friend who gives you these early warnings!

You’re welcome.  😀

Anyhoo . . .  you’ve come for a little Edumacation Cobwebs Style, so … shall we get on with it?

16th March 2018

On this Day in History

1689 – The 23rd Regiment of Foot or Royal Welch Fusiliers is founded.

1802 – The Army Corps of Engineers is established to found and operate the United States Military Academy at West Point.

1815 – Prince Willem proclaims himself King of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, the first constitutional monarch in the Netherlands.

1830 – London’s re-organised police force (Scotland Yard) forms.  New Scotland Yard (NSY) is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for law enforcement within Greater London, excluding the City district, which is covered by the City of London Police.

1867 – First publication of an article by Joseph Lister outlining the discovery of antiseptic surgery, in The Lancet.

1870 – The first version of the overture fantasy Romeo and Juliet  by Tchaikovsky receives its premiere performance.

1872 – The Wanderers F.C. won the first FA Cup, the oldest football competition in the world, beating Royal Engineers A.F.C. 1-0 at The Oval in Kennington, London.

1918 – Geoffrey O’Hara’s “K-K-K-Katy” song was published.  “K-K-K-Katy” was a popular World War I-era song written by Canadian American composer Geoffrey O’Hara in 1917 and published in 1918. The sheet music advertised it as “The Sensational Stammering Song Success Sung by the Soldiers and Sailors”.

The lyrics tell of a brave but awkward soldier called Jimmy who is lovesick over the beautiful Katy. He buys a wedding ring before going to fight in France.  It was a top 20 song from May 1918 to January 1919 and was number 1 from July to September.

1926 – History of Rocketry: Robert Goddard launches the first liquid-fuelled rocket, at Auburn, Massachusetts, it travels 184′ (56 meters).

1935 – Adolf Hitler orders Germany to rearm herself in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Conscription is reintroduced to form the Wehrmacht.

1939 – From Prague Castle, Hitler proclaims Bohemia and Moravia a German protectorate.

1940 – First person killed (James Isbister) in a German bombing raid on the UK in World War II during a raid on Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands.

1958 – The Ford Motor Company produces its 50 millionth automobile, the Thunderbird, averaging almost a million cars a year since the company’s founding.

1962 – A Flying Tiger Line Super Constellation (a propeller-driven, four-engined airliner) disappears in the western Pacific Ocean, with all 107 aboard missing and presumed dead.

1964 – Capitol released the Beatles record “Can’t Buy Me Lovebacked with “You Can’t Do That”.

1968 – General Motors produces its 100 millionth automobile, the Oldsmobile Toronado.

1972 – John & Yoko are served with deportation papers.  The Nixon Administration tried to have Lennon deported from the U.S., as Richard Nixon believed that Lennon’s proactive antiwar activities and support for George McGovern could cost him re-election.  Republican Senator Strom Thurmond suggested, in a February 1972 memo, that “deportation would be a strategic counter-measure” against Lennon.  The next month the Immigration and Naturalisation Service began deportation proceedings against Lennon, arguing that his 1968 misdemeanour conviction for cannabis possession in London had made him ineligible for admission to the U.S. Lennon spent the next four years in deportation hearings.

1976 – UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson resigned. Harold Wilson, Labour leader for 13 years and prime minister for almost eight, stunned the political world by announcing his resignation. Mr Wilson, who had turned 60 five days previously, made his bombshell announcement to his Cabinet that morning.
BBC News story on the Day complete with video footage.

1978 – Supertanker Amoco Cadiz splits in two after running aground on the Portsall Rocks, three miles off the coast of Brittany, resulting in the 5th largest oil spill in history.

1985 – Associated Press newsman Terry Anderson is taken hostage in Beirut. He is released on December 4, 1991.
1988 – Iran-Contra Affair: Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North and Vice Admiral John Poindexter are indicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

1988 – American off-road racing legend Mickey Thompson, and his wife Trudy were shot to death in their driveway. Thompson, known as the “Speed King,” set nearly 500 auto speed endurance records including being the first person to travel more than 400 mph on land.

On March 16, 1988 Mickey Thompson and his wife were killed by two gunmen at their home in Bradbury, California in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains.

An intense police investigation led nowhere until thirteen years after their deaths when former business partner Michael Frank Goodwin was charged in Orange County, California with the murders.  However, that case was overturned on jurisdictional grounds by the California District Court of Appeal.  On June 8, 2004, Goodwin was formally charged in Pasadena in Los Angeles County. In October 2006, a Pasadena Superior Court judge ordered Goodwin to stand trial for the murders.

On January 4, 2007 a jury found Michael Goodwin guilty of two counts of murder in the death of Mickey Thompson and his wife.  Goodwin was sentenced to two consecutive life-without-parole terms for the murders of Thompson and his wife. The judge also denied Goodwin’s motion for a new trial.

1994 – Tonya Harding plead guilty in Portland, OR, to conspiracy to hinder prosecution for covering up the attack on her skating rival Nancy Kerrigan. She was fined $100,000. She was also banned from amateur figure skating.

1995 – Mississippi formally ratifies the Thirteenth Amendment, becoming the last state to approve the abolition of slavery.  The Thirteenth Amendment was officially ratified in 1865.

2001 – A series of bomb blasts that took place in the city of Shijiazhuang, China killed 108 people and injured 38 others, was the biggest mass murder in China in decades.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Born on this Day

1789 – Georg Simon Ohm, German physicist (d. 1854) (discovered Ohm’s Law)

1839 – John Butler Yeats, Irish painter (d. 1922)

1856 – Napoléon Eugène, Prince Imperial, only child of Emperor Napoleon III of France (d. 1879)

1920 – Leo McKern, Australian-English actor (d. 2002)

1926 – Jerry Lewis, American comedian (d. 2017)

1948 – Michael Bruce, American musician (Alice Cooper)

1949 – Erik Estrada, Puerto Rican actor

1954 – Jimmy Nail, British actor and singer

1959 – Flavor Flav, American rapper, and reality tv star

1959 – Greg Dyer, Australian cricketer

1960 – Jenny Eclair, English comedian, actress and screenwriter

1961 – Todd McFarlane, Canadian comic book artist, writer and media entrepreneur, founded McFarlane Toys

1963 – Jerome Flynn, English actor and singer

1984 – Aisling Bea, Irish comedienne and actress

Died on this Day and remembered here

1970 – Tammi Terrell, American singer (b. 1945)

1975 – T-Bone Walker, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1910)

1983 – Arthur Godfrey, American actor and television host (b. 1903)

1998 – Derek Barton, English-American chemist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1918)

2003 – Rachel Corrie, American activist (b. 1979)

2003 – Ronald Ferguson, English captain, polo player, and manager (b. 1931) (father of Sarah Ferguson)

2013 – Frank Thornton, English actor (b. 1921) (perhaps known best for playing Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served?)

2014 – Steve Moore, English author and illustrator (b. 1949)

2016 – Frank Sinatra, Jr., American singer and actor (b. 1944) ( son of singer and actor Frank Sinatra)

PLAYTIME BELL RINGS ..  ~  ..  TIME FOR FUN!

These are the jokes folks ….

Conjunctivitis.com – that’s a site for sore eyes

Police arrested two kids yesterday. One was drinking battery acid, the other was eating fireworks. They charged one and let the other one off.

I usually meet my friend at 12:59 – because I like that one-to-one time.

Is it possible to mistake schizophrenia for telepathy?  I hear you ask.

As a child I was made to walk the plank. We couldn’t afford a dog.

Whenever I see a man with a beard, moustache and glasses, I think,  ‘There’s a man who has taken every precaution to avoid people doodling on photographs of him’

I needed a password eight characters long so I picked  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

And now it’s coffee and contemplation time . . .

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

If our eyes saw only souls instead of bodies, how differently do you think you’d actually see people?  Would you be able, I wonder, to see the struggles that they’ve been through, or are going through?  Would you be able to see that their outer persona of being  ‘non-approachable’  was actually just a self-protection thing, because of the amount of hurt and pain that person had suffered at the hands of others, and that in reality he/she was a soft gentle person with a heart which is able to love the world twice over?

If you saw only the soul of a person – would you still see the moody, aggressive teenager, or would you see the child they still were, and the bullying which they were experiencing at the hands of someone else?

If her soul presented itself to you next time you saw your mother –  would you see her as a nag who was constantly telling you how you need to __________ [fill in the blank space].  Or would you see how her love and concern for you is as strong today as it was the moment you were born, and what she’s actually doing now is simply trying to guide and protect you, because her love for you is all-encompassing?

This wonderful gift of seeing someone’s soul rather than seeing their ‘over-coat’ or body – is something we all need to put into action.  We need to use it as the tool which was actually given to us all at birth – but we’ve all forgotten how to do it.

So I’m here to gently push you into seeing the souls of people, instead of their ‘over-coat’.  It’s an easy enough thing to do.  Just remind yourself all the time to see the soul not the body – until eventually you won’t need to remind yourself for it will come naturally to you – just as breathing in and out does!

You’ll learn so much more, and you’ll treat people with more kindness, love, and understanding,  by seeing their soul, rather than their body.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Well schools out and we’ve finished out Edumacation for this week.  I hope you’ve learned something that you can take out into the world and share with someone else.  People are going to think you’re oh SO clever!

This week has been a busy one here in Cobweb Towers.  phew!  Between Doctors appointments, hospital appointments, garage (car) visits,  Little Cobs visiting, (which is always a joy, but cooo,  he’s a Grammy Exhaustion Factory in one small boy!)  – and then, just to make sure that the cake had a cherry on the top:  the dishwasher turned its toes up and died.

Mr.Cobs says he doesn’t think we need to buy a new one because, he says, he really rather likes washing the dishes.  I’m not sure if I passed out at this point but I do feel that several hours are missing from that point.   We shall see if he changes his mind, and in the meantime I’ll do a bit of looking around the internet to see what’s on offer – just in case.

Well … that’s me done and dusted.  I shall hang my school teachers cap and gown up for another week and become the child I really am for the rest of the time.  😀

May your Friday be joyful, may your weekend be filled with warm smiles.  And may you find contentment nestling in your heart.

Sending squidges  … 

Sig coffee copy

 

 

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The Friday Post ~ Your Edumacation for 2nd March 2018

Aaand here we are again. Another Friday Edumacation and yet another week where I haven’t posted any crafty things.  [sigh]  I do have things.  Two things in fact – but I can’t find where I saved the photos on my ‘puter!   Thankfully, I still have the photos on my phone, so I can load them all over again, re-size them, add the watermark and then load them onto the media bit of my blog.  Of course … none of this would have happened if  … (get ready for a bit of singing)  … 🎵 🎶  ‘if I only had a brain’  🎵 🎶 

But I haven’t, so doing the loading/re-sizing/water-mark/saving  combo,  all over again, is the choice I have.

Aaanywhooo….  Let’s get going with your edumacation, shall we?

2nd March

On this Day in History

1717 – The Loves of Mars and Venus becomes the first ballet performed in England.

1903 – The Martha Washington Hotel opened for business in New York City. The hotel had 416 rooms and was the first hotel exclusively for women.

1923 – Time magazine debuts
1925 – State and federal highway officials developed a nationwide route-numbering system and adopted the familiar U.S. shield-shaped, numbered marker.

1933 – The film King Kong opens at New York’s Radio City Music Hall.

1943 – 173 people die in the Bethnal Green Tube Disaster, London, the worst civilian disaster of World War 2.
The Bethnal Green Disaster @ Wikipedia.

1949 – Captain James Gallagher lands his B-50 Superfortress Lucky Lady II in Fort Worth, Texas after completing the first non-stop around-the-world airplane flight in 94 hours and one minute.
1949 – The first automatic street light was installed in New Milford, Conn.

1950 – Silly Putty was invented.  Silly Putty (originally called nutty putty, and also known as Potty Putty) is a silicone plastic, marketed today as a toy for children, but originally created as an accident during the course of research into potential rubber substitutes for use by the United States during World War II.

During World War II, the USA was looking for a synthetic rubber compound because of the difficulties in obtaining natural rubber from the Far East.  In researching this problem, James Wright of General Electric reacted boric acid with silicone oil and produced a gooey material – though it bounced it was certainly not a rubber substitute. No uses for it were found until the 1950’s when its potential as a toy was realised.  It was after its success as a toy that other uses were found.  It has found applications in medical and scientific simulations, and has also been used in stress-reduction and physical therapy.  In the home it can be used to pick up dirt, lint and pet hair, and it was even used by Apollo astronauts to secure tools in zero-gravity.

Silly Putty

History of Silly Putty
Silly Putty’s origin was due to a wartime accident.  During World War II, Japan invaded rubber producing countries in order to cut off the United States supply of rubber.  It was needed in order to produce tires for vehicles, boots for solders, gas masks, rafts, and even bombers.  To help combat the lack of rubber US citizens were asked to donate any rubber around their house such as spare tires, rubber boots, and rubber rain coats.  All rubber made products were rationed and citizens had to make their products last till the end of the war.  Also in response the government asked producers to try and come up with a synthetic rubber compound.

In 1943, James Wright, a Scottish engineer, worked for General Electric in a New Haven, Connecticut laboratory.  Combining a boric acid and silicone oil, Wright had ended up with a putty that had some unique properties.  The putty would bounce when dropped, and could stretch farther than regular rubber, would not collect mould, and had a very high melting temperature.  Unfortunately the substance did not contain the properties needed to replace rubber. In 1945 hoping there was a use for his new developed putty Wright sent a sample to scientists all around the world, but no practical use was ever found.

Finally, in 1949, the putty reached the owner of a toy store, Ruth Fallgatter, who contacted Peter Hodgson, a marketing consultant, to produce her catalogue and discuss bouncing putty.  The two decided to market their bouncing putty selling it in a clear case for $2.  The putty outsold every item in the catalogue except for 50-cent Crayola crayons.  Despite the fortune it made, Fallgatter did not pursue it any more, but Hodgson saw its potential.

Already $12,000 in debt, Hodgson borrowed $147 to buy a batch of the putty to pack one ounce portions into plastic eggs for $1, calling it silly putty.  After making progress in the industry, even selling over 250,000 eggs of silly putty in three days, Hodgson was almost put out of business in 1951 by the Korean War.  Silicone, a main ingredient in silly putty, was put on ration, hurting his business.  In 1952, a year later, the restriction on silicone was lifted and silly putty production resumed.  In the beginning, its target market was mainly adults.  However, by 1955 the majority of the consumers were aged 6 through 12.  In 1957 Hodgson produced the first televised commercial for silly putty, which aired during the Howdy Doody Show.

In 1961, Silly Putty went worldwide, becoming a hit in the Soviet Union, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, and Switzerland.  Silly Putty went to the moon in 1968 with the Apollo 8 astronauts.

Peter Hodgson died in 1976.  A year later, Binney and Smith, the makers of Crayola products, acquired the rights to Silly Putty.  By 1987, Silly Putty had pushed sales to over two million eggs annually.
CLICK HERE to be taken to a cutting from a newspaper talking about silly putty, from years ago – includes photographs.  (this will open in another window for you).  When the page loads, click on the newspaper clipping to enlarge it so that you can read it easily.

1953 – The Academy Awards are first broadcast on television by NBC.  The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are presented annually by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) to recognise excellence of professionals in the film industry, including directors, actors, and writers.  The formal ceremony at which the awards are presented is one of the most prominent film award ceremonies in the world.  The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences itself was conceived by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studio boss Louis B. Mayer.

Acadamey Award

The 1st Academy Awards ceremony was held on Thursday, May 16, 1929, at the Hotel Roosevelt in Hollywood to honour outstanding film achievements of 1927 and 1928.  It was hosted by actor Douglas Fairbanks and director William C. deMille.

1958 – 1st surface crossing of Antarctic continent is completed in 99 days by Sir Vivian Ernest Fuchs FRS (February 11, 1908 – November 11, 1999).  Fuchs was an English explorer whose expeditionary team completed the first overland crossing of Antarctica in 1958.

1965 – “Sound Of Music” opens.  The Sound of Music is a musical with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and a book by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse.  It is based on Maria von Trapp’s book  ‘The Story of the Trapp Family Singers’.  Songs from the musical that have become standards include “The Sound of Music”, “Edelweiss”, “My Favourite Things”, “Climb Ev’ry Mountain”, and “Do-Re-Mi”.

The original Broadway production opened in November 1959, and the show has enjoyed numerous productions and revivals since then.  It was made into a popular 1965 movie musical.  The Sound of Music was the final musical written by Rodgers and Hammerstein;  Hammerstein died of cancer nine months after the premiere.

1968 – Baggeridge Colliery closes marking the end of over 300 years of coal mining in The Black Country.

The Black Country is a region of the West Midlands in England, west of Birmingham.  During the Industrial Revolution, it became one of the most industrialised parts of Britain with coal mines, coking, iron foundries, glass factories, brick-works and steel mills.

Baggeridge Colliery – closing on 2 March 1968, marked the end of an era after some 300 years of mass coal mining in the region.

Links:  The Black Country – explained by Wikipedia (will open in a new tab for you). 

 … and …  The Black Country Living Museum (BCLM) – which is a wonderful website giving you a glimpse into the Living Museum itself.  It’s not a typical building type of museum, but roads, streets lots of buildings – and as you walk in through the entrance – you’re instantly taken back to times gone by.  All the money used is the money of the time.  All the people there are dressed exactly as people of the time would be dressed.  It’s a clickable website which is easy to navigate and very much worthy of a look.  Nostalgia will probably sweep you along, if you are ‘of an age’, and if you’re ever in the area – I would strongly recommend a trip there. (The link will open in a new tab for you).

1969 – In Toulouse, France the first test flight of the Anglo-French Concorde is conducted.
BBC News on the Day

1976 – Walt Disney World logged its 50 millionth guest
1978 – 1st broadcast of “Dallas” on CBS TV

1983 – Compact Disc recordings developed by Phillips & Sony introduced
1989 – Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” premieres on worldwide Pepsi commercial

1989 – Twelve European Community nations agree to ban the production of all chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by the end of the century.

The haloalkanes (also known as halogenoalkanes or alkyl halides) are a group of chemical compounds, consisting of alkanes, such as methane or ethane, with one or more halogens linked, such as chlorine or fluorine, making them a type of organic halide.  They are a subset of the halocarbons, similar to haloalkenes and haloaromatics.  They are known under many chemical and commercial names.  As flame retardants, fire extinguishants, refrigerants, propellants and solvents they have or had wide use.  Some haloalkanes (those containing chlorine or bromine) have been shown to have negative effects on the environment such as ozone depletion.  The most widely known family within this group is the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).

A haloalkane is a chemical compound derived from an alkane by substituting one or more hydrogen atoms with halogen atoms.  Mixed compounds are also possible, the best-known examples being the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) which are mainly responsible for ozone depletion.

Freon is a trade name for a group of chlorofluorocarbons used primarily as a refrigerant. The word Freon is a registered trademark belonging to DuPont.

Two groups of haloalkanes, hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), are targets of the Kyoto Protocol. [1] Allan Thornton, President of Environmental Investigation Agency, an environmental watchdog, says that HFCs are up to 12,500 times as potent as carbon dioxide in global warming.  Wealthy countries are clamping down on these gases.  Thornton says that many countries are needlessly producing these chemicals just to get the carbon credits.  Thus, as a result of carbon trading rules under the Kyoto Protocol, nearly half the credits from developing countries are from HFCs, with China scoring billions of dollars from catching and destroying HFCs that would be in the atmosphere as industrial byproducts.

On September 21, 2007, approximately 200 countries agreed to accelerate the elimination of hydrochlorofluorocarbons entirely by 2020 in a United Nations-sponsored Montreal summit.  Developing nations were given until 2030. Many nations, such as the United States and China, who had previously resisted such efforts, agreed with the accelerated phase out schedule.

1990 – Nelson Mandela is elected deputy President of the African National Congress.

1991 – Battle at Rumaila oil field brings an end to the 1991 Gulf War.

1994 – Branch Davidian cult leader David Koresh promises to surrender if taped statement is broadcast; it is, but he doesn’t.  David Koresh (August 17, 1959 – April 19, 1993) was the leader of a Branch Davidian religious sect, believing himself to be the final prophet.  A 1993 raid by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives and subsequent siege by the FBI ended with the burning of the Branch Davidian ranch. Koresh, 53 adults and 21 children died in the fire.  Read more about this man, here: David Koresh @ Wikipedia

1995 – British trader Nick Leeson arrested for collapse of Barings Bank PLC. Nicholas Leeson (born February 25, 1967) was a former derivatives trader whose unsupervised speculative trading caused the collapse of Barings Bank, the United Kingdom’s oldest investment bank.

In 1992, he was appointed general manager of a new operation in futures markets on the Singapore International Monetary Exchange (SIMEX).  Barings had held a seat on SIMEX for some time, but did not activate it until Leeson was sent over.

Leeson 1

From 1992, Leeson made unauthorized speculative trades that at first made large profits for Barings; £10 million which accounted for 10% of Barings’ annual income.  He earned a bonus of £130,000 on his salary of £50,000 for that year.  However, his luck soon went sour, and he used one of Barings’ error accounts (accounts used to correct mistakes made in trading) to hide his losses.  The account was numbered 88888 — a number considered very lucky in Chinese numerology.  Leeson claims that this account was first used to hide an error made by one of his colleagues; rather than buy 20 contracts as the customer had ordered, she had sold them, costing Barings £20,000.  However, Leeson used this account to cover further bad trades. He insists that he never used the account for his own gain, but in 1996 the New York Times quoted “British press reports” as claiming that investigators had located approximately $35 million in various bank accounts tied to him.

Management at Barings Bank also allowed Leeson to remain Chief Trader while being responsible for settling his trades, jobs that are usually done by two different people.  This made it much simpler for him to hide his losses from his superiors.

By the end of 1992, the account’s losses exceeded £2 million, which ballooned to £208 million by the end of 1994.

There were clues in Leeson’s lifestyle off the trading floor that he was headed for trouble.  In October 1994 he was arrested and spent a night in a Singaporean jail after an incident in which he exposed his buttocks in public to two women.  His superiors at Barings persuaded The International Financing Review to re-write a planned reference to the incident in its gossip column to cover it up.

The beginning of the end occurred on 16 January 1995, when Leeson placed a short straddle in the Stock Exchange of Singapore and Tokyo stock exchanges, essentially betting that the Japanese stock market would not move significantly overnight.  However, the Kobe earthquake hit early in the morning on January 17, sending Asian markets, and Leeson’s investments, into a tailspin.  Leeson attempted to recoup his losses by making a series of increasingly risky new investments, this time betting that the Nikkei Stock Average would make a rapid recovery.  But the recovery failed to materialise, and he succeeded only in digging a deeper hole.

Realising the gravity of the situation, Leeson left a note reading “I’m Sorry” and fled on 23 February.  Losses eventually reached £827 million (US$1.4 billion), twice the bank’s available trading capital.  After a failed bailout attempt, Barings was declared insolvent on 26 February.

After fleeing to Malaysia, Thailand and finally Germany, Leeson was arrested and extradited back to Singapore on 2 March 1995, though his wife Lisa was allowed to return to England.  While he had authorisation for the January 15 short straddle, he was charged with fraud for deceiving his superiors about the riskiness of his activities and the scale of his losses.  Several observers (and Leeson himself) have placed much of the blame on the bank’s own deficient internal auditing and risk management practices.  Indeed, the Singapore authorities’ report on the collapse was scathingly critical of Barings management, claiming that senior officials knew or should have known about the “five eights” account.

Sentenced to six and a half years in Changi Prison in Singapore, he was released from prison in 1999, having been diagnosed with colon cancer, which he survived despite grim forecasts at the time.

While in prison, in 1996, Leeson published an autobiography, Rogue Trader, detailing his acts.  A review in the financial columns of the New York Times stated, “This is a dreary book, written by a young man very taken with himself, but it ought to be read by banking managers and auditors everywhere.”

Nick Leeson & Leona Tormay

Aftermath
Nick Leeson’s first wife Lisa divorced him while he was in prison. He married an Irish beautician, Leona Tormay, (above)  in 2003 and they now live in Barna, County Galway in the west of Ireland.  He is a regular guest on the after-dinner speaking circuit.  He was appointed Commercial Manager of Galway United Football Club in April 2005, rising to the position of General Manager in late November 2005.  By July 2007 he had become the club’s CEO.  He still finds time to deal in the stock markets, but only with his own money.

In June 2005, Leeson released a new book Back from the Brink: Coping with Stress. It picks up his story where Rogue Trader left off, including in-depth conversations with psychologist Ivan Tyrrell asserting how the prolonged periods of severe stress that affected Leeson’s mental and physical health have parallels in many other people’s lives.
Nick Leeson’s Official Website
Leeson’s legacy lives on in Singapore
Business: The Economy How Leeson broke the bank

1998 – Data sent from the Galileo spacecraft indicates that Jupiter’s moon Europa has a liquid ocean under a thick crust of ice.

2004 – NASA announced that the Mars rover Opportunity had discovered evidence that water had existed on Mars in the past.

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Born on this Day.

1904 – Dr Seuss [Theodor Geisel] American writer, cartoonist and children’s book author

1917 – Desi Arnaz, Cuban-born American actor (Ricky Ricardo-I Love Lucy) and bandleader (d. 1986)

1923 – Basil Hume, English cardinal (d. 1999)

1931 – Mikhail Gorbachev, Russian lawyer and politician, President of the Soviet Union, Nobel Prize laureate

1942 – Lou Reed, American singer-songwriter, guitarist, producer, and actor (d. 2013)

1947 – Harry Redknapp, English footballer and manager

1950 – Karen Carpenter, American singer and drummer (The Carpenters) (d. 1983)

1955 – Jay Osmond Ogden UT, singer (Osmond Brothers, Donny & Marie)

1956 – Mark Evans, Australian rock bassist (AC/DC)

1958 – Ian Woosnam, Welsh golfer

1962 – Jon Bon Jovi, American musician (Bon Jovi)

1968 – Daniel Craig, English actor – the sixth actor to portray the fictional intelligence officer James Bond.

1971 – Dave Gorman, English documentary comedian

1977 – Chris Martin, English musician (Coldplay)

1980 – Rebel Wilson, Australian actress and screenwriter

1988 – James Arthur, English singer-songwriter

~  ❤  ~

Died on this Day  and remembered here

1930 – D. H. Lawrence, English novelist, poet, playwright, and critic (b. 1885)

1999 – Dusty Springfield, English singer (b. 1939)

2007 – Thomas S. Kleppe, American soldier and politician, 41st United States Secretary of the Interior (b. 1919)

2012 – James Q. Wilson, American political scientist and academic (b. 1931)

2016 – Benoît Lacroix, Canadian priest, historian, and philosopher (b. 1915).

~  ❤  ~

PLAYTIME BELL RINGS ..  ~  ..  TIME FOR FUN!

These are the jokes folks ….

Husband:  “Oh the weather is lovely today. Shall we go out for a quick jog?“
Wife: “Ha!, I love the way you pronounce ‘Shall we go out and have a cake’!”

I asked my daughter if she’d seen my newspaper.  She told me that newspapers are old school.  She said that people use tablets nowadays and handed me her iPad.  The fly didn’t stand a chance. 

I went to the petting zoo today.   Not one person would stroke me.

Mr Cobs keeps telling me that he has the body of a Greek god.  I’m going to have to explain where Buddha actually comes from.

What does a cloud with an itchy rash do?  . . .  It finds the nearest skyscraper.

What would you call a female magician in the desert? . . .  A sandwich.   (Get it?  If not – say it slowly out loud. lol)

I used to breed rabbits.  Then I realised they can handle it themselves.

Need cheering up?  Start a fight with somebody when they have the hiccoughs!

According to my mirror I am pregnant.  The father is Nutella.

If you had to decide between a diet and a piece of chocolate, would you prefer dark, white or milk chocolate?

I’m all for irony, but the phrase “Good morning” seems to be going a bit too far.

~  and now, dear reader, it’s time for coffee and contemplation.  ~

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the day

I read something a few days ago that said children laughed approximately 400 times a day, but adults laugh only about 20 times a day.

So … this got me thinking, and …. I’m here with a challenge.

Get a note-book.  Or a few sheets of printer paper, and fold them in half to make a little note book, and then sit the ‘book’ next to your computer, with a pen.  Then …  DAILY write down at least three things that you’re grateful for.

Actually put them down on paper.  I don’t care how mundane you think they are.  I don’t care how daft they might look to other people.  If you’re grateful for it, then it’s worth while acknowledging.  And what’s more … if you begin to find that you can name more than three things, then keep going!

I’m not going to ask you in a weeks time to share your list with anyone.  Obviously … you can if you wish, but this challenge isn’t that sort of challenge.

This challenge is a personal, just to yourself, challenge, to find things in your life that you love;  that make your life wonderful;  things that, if they suddenly disappeared from your life,  you’d miss them.  

It could be a person or a group of folks.  It could be your home.  Your spouse/partner.  Your car.  Your garden.  The people in the local shop(s).  The store across the road.  Your job.  Your colleagues.  It could be the health people at your doctors or hospital who know their jobs so well that they’re working hard on your behalf to sort out a problem.

It could be a friend …  or a few friends.  It could even be your computer!

Yes, … actually …  that’s a good one.  Just think how miserable your days would be if your computer no longer worked.  You certainly wouldn’t be able to be here reading this, would you?

Let’s make some changes in our lives which would make us feel more positive.  Make us feel great.  Give us something wonderful to get up for in the morning.

Let’s remind ourselves of how darned rootin’ tootin’ fabulous life itself is, and how privileged we are to have been blessed with what we are blessed with.

Count your blessings.  Go on . . .   start now.  START RIGHT NOW.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Well, that’s school over and done with.  We’ve taken care of your edumacation;  we’ve done a bit of physical education and exercised your chuckle muscle;  and we’ve taken care of your mental health by giving you something to think about.  And this week, just for a change …. you’ve got homework.  Your note-book and pen will be put to good use every day as you write your three (or more) things you’re blessed with.

I’ve already got one of my things in my book ….  you!  I’m blessed with having YOU in my life.  You’re one of my blessings.  Thank you for being you.  I love who you are.

Well … I guess it’s time for us to now move our bodies and get a bit of a happy wriggle on.  So drink up the last sips of your coffee, and we’ll get on with Friday, shall we?

I’ll have to put on my snow shoes, because we’ve got a ‘fabulous’ falling of snow here, and although it’s stopped for the time being (as I’m typing)  …. the weather people are saying that there’s going to be another shed load delivered during the night.

The poor dog isn’t happy about it.  She’s only got short legs, and she’s got a big belly … so the belly gets dragged through the snow.  Having a ‘tiddle’ isn’t the fun thing it normally is … and finding a place to … well … do the ‘other’ thing … she’s totally flummoxed.  Where’s the grass and the dirt???  I swear to Dog that she’s blaming Mr. Cobs for this stuff.  LOL.

Now the cats …   well . . .  Alf Capone finds the whole thing LOTS of fun especially on the decking, for as each tiny flake lands he bats it onto the decking to catch it.  Problem is that this stuff is magical.  He KNOWS he caught ‘it’ …. but when he lifts his great big panther sized paw, the thing has disappeared!  GASP!!!  So funny.  He can’t figure it out.

However ... Miss Maisie Dotes thinks she’s way above and beyond this ridiculous stuff, after all, everyone knows she’s a Princess, and whatever the white stuff is, it’s not anything like Princessy, so can we please get it cleaned up as it’s making climbing the fence a wholly disappointing thing to attempt.  Plus … it’s too cold on her tiny Princess toes.

These animals are such a joy.  I love them from nose to toes to tip of tail.

Oh look …  three more blessings!  Hey heeey..…  I’m beating you already!  You’d better get a big wriggle on because at this rate I’m going to have filled my book before you’ve got to the end of page one!  LOL

Have a truly fabulous Friday, and may your weekend fill you with joy, warmth and contentment.

Sending you love from me, here in my corner, to you, there in yours.

Sig coffee copy

 

 

The Friday Post ~ Edumacation for 23rd February

Not sure if you noticed this, so draw your attention to it  . . .   I finally managed to work out how to get my ‘Edumacation‘ word into the title of this regular Friday Post.  It’s only taken me FOREVER to work out how to make it short and to the point.  (But then … we all know that I don’t use one word when 20 will do). lol

Before we get into this weeks Edumacation, I’m going to take this moment to get a couple of moans out of the way:

  • WORDPRESS :  pin back your lugholes WordPress!   One of my much loved followers comments are suddenly now going into the Spam folder.  Sometimes it has taken days before I’ve noticed them, and that makes me feel just awful.  Please could you sort out why her comments are going straight to spam, and stop it from doing that?
  • LAWS OF GRAVITY ….  Kindly bu&&er off when you see me falling over.  Yes, I’ve said it and I swore in saying it.  Instead of  you,  I would like a kindly Angel or two to catch me and soften the fall for me.  I’m not asking for someone to lift me up, or make me float, I’m simply asking for someone to help me NOT land [on my knees] like a SACK OF POTATOES being dropped from a hi-rise building!  My latest fall happened two weeks ago tomorrow, and I am still in much pain with my poor feet (my toes got bent too far – ouch!);  my knees – I can barely stand up from the chair, and when I do, I can’t walk more than about ten little bent over shuffles.;  the bend of my leg at the top of my thigh – arrrrrrrrgh!;  my hips – I swear my knees were pushed up to my hips when I landed;  and finally ….  my back.  Oh.  My.  Goodness!  I had more than enough problems there in the first place – but now there’s this new lorry load of pain to deal with on top of the original stuff!   Laws of Gravity, please step out and instruct a couple of Angels to help on the next falling over.

(dearest reader  – this fall wasn’t due to alcohol in any way.  I rarely drink alcohol.  Christmas, weddings – and then only a small glass.  I’m just not over-struck with alcohol.  It tastes weird and I prefer to drink plain Tonic Water with ice).

Ok … those two moans will do for now because, well, you’re here for your Edumacation lesson, so . . .   without further ado, shall we begin?

23rd February

On this Day in History

1455 – Traditional date for the publication of the Gutenberg Bible, the first Western book printed from movable type.

1836 – The Battle of the Alamo begins in San Antonio, Texas.
1839 In Boston, MA, William F. Harnden organised the first express service between Boston and New York City.  It was the first express service in the U.S.
1861 – President-elect Abraham Lincoln arrives secretly in Washington, D.C., after the thwarting of an alleged assassination plot in Baltimore, Maryland.
1874 Walter Winfield patented a game called “sphairistike.” More widely known as lawn tennis.
1886 –  London Times publishes world’s 1st classified ad.

1898 – Émile Zola is imprisoned in France after writing “J’accuse,” a letter accusing the French government of Antisemitism wrongfully placing Captain Alfred Dreyfus in jail.

J’accuse (“I accuse”) was an open letter published on January 13, 1898, in the newspaper L’Aurore by the influential writer Émile Zola.

J accuse

The letter was addressed to President of France Félix Faure, and accused the government of Antisemitism and the unlawful jailing of Alfred Dreyfus, a French General Staff officer sentenced to penal servitude for life for espionage. Zola pointed out judicial errors and lack of serious evidence. The letter was printed on the first page of the newspaper, and caused a stir in France and abroad. Zola was prosecuted and found guilty of libel on February 23, 1898. To avoid imprisonment, he fled to England, returning home in June 1899.

Other pamphlets proclaiming Dreyfus’s innocence include Bernard Lazare’s A Miscarriage of Justice: The Truth about the Dreyfus Affair (November 1896).

As a result of the popularity of the letter, even in the English-speaking world, J’accuse! has become a common generic expression of outrage and accusation against a powerful person.

1905 – Chicago attorney Paul Harris and three other businessmen meet for lunch – form the Rotary Club, the world’s first service club.

Rotary International is an organisation of service clubs known as Rotary Clubs located all over the world. It is a secular organisation open to all persons regardless of race, colour, creed or political preference. There are more than 32,000 clubs and over 1.2 million members world-wide. The members of Rotary Clubs are known as Rotarian’s. The stated purpose of the organisation is to bring together business and professional leaders to provide humanitarian service, encourage high ethical standards in all vocations, and help build goodwill and peace in the world. Members usually meet weekly for breakfast, lunch or dinner, which is a social event as well as an opportunity to organise work on their service goals.

Rotary’s best-known motto is “Service above Self”, and its secondary motto is “They profit most who serve best”.

1940 Walt Disney’s animated movie “Pinocchio”, released.

Pinocchio

Pinocchio is a wooden marionette (a puppet that is manipulated with wires) and not a hand puppet (directly controlled from inside by the puppeteer’s hand). But the piece of wood from which he is derived is animated, and so Pinocchio moves independently. Basically good, he often gets carried away by bad company and is prone to lying. His nose will become longer and longer once he starts lying to others.  Because of these characteristics he often finds himself in trouble, from which, however, he always manages to get out. Pinocchio undergoes transformations during the novel: he promises The Fairy with Turquoise Hair to become a real boy, flees with Candlewick to the Land of Toys, becomes a donkey, joins a circus, and becomes a puppet again. In the last chapter, out of the mouth of The Terrible Dogfish with Geppetto, finally stops being a puppet and becomes a real boy (thanks to the intervention of the Fairy in a dream).

In the novel, Pinocchio is often depicted with a pointy hat, a jacket and a pair of coloured, knee-length pants. In the Disney version, the appearance is very different, and the character is dressed in Tyrolean style, with Lederhosen and a hat with a feather.

Pinocchio’s nose is his best-known characteristic. It grows in length when he tells a lie.

The nose only appears a couple of times in the story, but it reveals the Blue Fairy’s power over Pinocchio when he acts disobediently. After struggling and weeping over his deformed nose, the Blue Fairy summons woodpeckers to peck it back to normal.

1941 – Plutonium was first produced and isolated by Dr. Glenn T. Seaborg. Plutonium is a rare transuranic radioactive element. It is an actinide metal of silvery-white appearance that tarnishes when exposed to air, forming a dull coating when oxidised. It reacts with carbon, halogens, nitrogen and silicon.

plutonium

When exposed to moist air, it forms oxides and hydrides that expand the sample up to 70% in volume, which in turn flake off as a powder that can spontaneously ignite. It is also a radio-logical poison that accumulates in bone marrow. These and other properties make the handling of plutonium dangerous, although its overall toxicity is sometimes overstated.

1945 – World War II: During the Battle of Iwo Jima, a group of United States Marines and a commonly forgotten U.S. Navy Corpsman, reach the top of Mount Suribachi on the island and are photographed raising the American flag.  The photo would later win a Pulitzer Prize and become the model for the national USMC War Memorial.

raising the flag

1954 – The first mass vaccination of children against polio began in Pittsburgh, PA.

1963 – Peter Hicks, a farmer from Sussex in England, who electrified his car to ward off traffic wardens in London’s Convent Garden, found out he may be able to evade the law. Read more of this story here: news.bbc.co.uk – Peter Hicks   (opens in new window for you). 

1963 – The Chiffons’ He’s So Fine was released.

1970 – Holy Eucharist given by women for 1st time in Roman Catholic service
1972 – Elvis and Priscilla Presley separated.
1974 – Columbia Records released Billy Joel’s “Piano Man.”

1998In central Florida, tornadoes killed 42 people and damaged and/or destroyed about 2,600 homes and businesses.
1998 – Osama bin Laden publishes a fatwa declaring jihad against all Jews and “Crusaders;” – the latter term is commonly interpreted to refer to the people of Europe and the United States.

2010 – Unknown criminals pour more than 2.5 million litres of diesel oil and other hydrocarbons into the river Lambro, in northern Italy, sparking an environmental disaster.

❤  ❤  ❤

Born on this Day

1592 – Balthazar Gerbier, Dutch painter (d. 1663)

1633 – Samuel Pepys – of London England, navy expert/composer (Diary, Memoirs)

1685 – George Frideric Handel, German-English organist and composer (d. 1759)

1817 – George Watts London, painter & sculptor

1947 – Shakira Caine Guyana, actress (Man Who be King) – Miss Guyana (1967) wife of Michael Caine

1952 – Brad Whitford, – American musician (Aerosmith)

1959 – Linda Nolan, Irish singer and actress – (The Nolan Sisters)

1964 – Dana Katherine Scully fictional character (X-Files)

1983 – Emily Blunt, English actress

1994 – Dakota Fanning, American actress

~  ❤  ~

Died on this Day (and remembered here)

1821 – John Keats, English poet (b. 1795)

1931 – Nellie Melba, Australian soprano and actress (b. 1861)

1934 – Edward Elgar, English composer and academic (b. 1857)

1965 – Stan Laurel comedian (Laurel & Hardy), died in California of heart attack at 74

1976 – LS Lowry,  English artist (b. 1887)

1995 – Melvin Franklin, American singer (The Temptations) (b. 1942)

1995 – James Herriot,  English writer (b. 1916)

2000 – Stanley Matthews,  English footballer (b. 1915)

❤ ❤  ❤

Playtime Bell Rings!  ~

These are the jokes folks!

Knock knock.

Who’s there?

Yoda lady.

Yoda lady who?

wow, Great yodeling!

if you didn’t ‘get it’  – say it all over again, only this time out loud.

Apparently taking a day off is not something you should do when you work for a calendar company.

What’s the biggest pan in the world?
Japan

What do snowmen do in their spare time?  Chill.

Vegans believe meat eaters and butchers are gross.
But those who sell you fruits and vegetables are grocer.

I’ve seen this show about beavers last night – best dam documentary I’ve ever seen!

Why does Peter Pan fly all the time? …   Neverlands!

Should pregnant women actually be called … body builders?

What did the blonde girl say when she saw Cheerios? …  “Donut seeds!”

I hope when I inevitably choke to death on gummy bears people just say I was killed by bears and leave it at that.

I hate when I’m running on the treadmill for half an hour and look down to see it’s been 4 minutes.

I entered what I ate today into my new fitness app  and it just sent an ambulance to my house.

My kids are at an age now where they are beginning to understand embarrassment. This is my time to shine.

I’m not saying your perfume is too strong. I’m just saying the canary was alive before you got here.

❤  ❤  ❤

Ahh …. and now we’ve reached coffee time,  and a moment of contemplation. . . 

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

“Father, into your hands I commend my spirit.”  …..  Those are said to be the last words spoken by Jesus Christ, and they have inspired a number of people, both great and small.  And … they inspire me every morning … for they aren’t my last words, they are my first with the dawn of every new day.

I can think of no better person to take care of my living spirit, than my Father.  For while He’s taking care of ‘stuff’, I can get on with all the other stuff.

Give it a try.  Let Him take care of stuff, while you go off and enjoy your day doing the ‘stuff’ you’re meant to be doing.

~  ❤  ~ ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Well … that was a great read today, wasn’t it!  I learned so much …  sadly, my one and only brain cell has developed a leak.  On windy days it makes a gentle sound which goes:  shhhhhhrupppp.  On rainy days it makes a sound like:  [insert long wet raspberry noise here].

I’m guessing that the gentle shhhhhrupppp noise is actually the brain cell telling me to ‘shut up’.  The long wet raspberry noise – well I’m not really sure I know what it’s telling me when it makes that noise, but it worries me greatly that others might hear it and think that I’ve ….  well …. you knoweek!  :/

Thank you so much for coming.  I so enjoy your company.  I take this opportunity to say hello to new friends too.  Please new people, don’t be shy.  Everyone here is a total delight and you’ll soon get to know them all.  Say hello, in a comment, and before you know it people will be replying to your comments when they begin to recognise your name.  And … if you have a blog yourself, you’ll no doubt gain some followers too!

Have a truly wonderful Friday, all.  And remember …   as far as anyone knows, we are all nice, normal people here!

Sig coffee copy

 

The Friday Post ~ 16th February 2018

HAApeeee Friday!

Well I don’t know about anyone else, but this was a week and a half!  I don’t know why it seemed so long, but I was beginning to think that Friday was never going to arrive!  But … I should have trusted it…  for here it is. 🙂

Well, you’re here for this weeks expensive edumacation, so find a seat, put your chewing gum in the bin, get your books out and a pen or pencil  (crayon for you … you know who you are – oh, and your mother says you are NOT to eat ANY crayons this week!) – put the date a the top of your page, and we shall begin.

Ready?  Here we go . . .

On this Day in History

1742 – Spencer Compton, Earl of Wilmington, becomes British Prime Minister.

1852 – Studebaker Brothers wagon company, precursor of the automobile manufacturer, is established.

Studebaker Corporation, or simply Studebaker, was a United States wagon and automobile manufacturer based in South Bend, Indiana. Originally, the company was a producer of wagons for farmers, miners and the military, founded in 1852 and incorporated in 1868 under the name of the Studebaker Brothers Manufacturing Company.

Studebaker entered the automotive business in 1902 with electric vehicles and in 1904 with gasoline vehicles, all sold under the name “Studebaker Automobile Company”. It partnered with other builders of gasoline-powered vehicles—Garford and E-M-F—until 1911.

The first gasoline cars to be fully manufactured by Studebaker were marketed in August 1912. Over the next 40 years, the company established an enviable reputation for quality and reliability.

In 1954, after a dramatic and unexpected fall in sales, Studebaker merged with the Packard Motor Car Company, forming the Studebaker-Packard Corporation.  The final Packard-designed cars were built by the company in Detroit in 1956, and the last Packards with Studebaker bodies were built in 1958.  “Packard” was then dropped from the company’s name as Studebaker rapidly diversified, buying up companies such as Schaefer, which made commercial refrigerators, STP, which made automotive oil treatments, and Paxton Products, which made automobile superchargers.  Even a commercial airline, Trans International Airlines, founded by Kirk Kerkorian, came into the corporate fold in the early ‘sixties.

By 1963, however, the company’s mainstay products, automobiles and trucks, were selling very poorly. The South Bend plant was closed and cars were built solely at the satellite plant in Hamilton, Ontario until March 1966.

Studebaker merged with Worthington Corporation to become Studebaker-Worthington in 1967 . McGraw-Edison purchased Studebaker-Worthington in 1979, eliminating the century-old Studebaker name from the corporate landscape.

1923 – Howard Carter unseals the burial chamber of Pharaoh Tutankhamun.  Tutankhamun (1341 BC – 1323 BC) was an Egyptian Pharaoh of the Eighteenth dynasty (ruled 1333 BC – 1324 BC in the conventional chronology), during the period of Egyptian history known as the New Kingdom.  The 1922 discovery by Howard Carter of Tutankhamun’s intact tomb received worldwide press coverage and sparked a renewed public interest in ancient Egypt, for which Tutankhamun’s burial mask remains the popular face.

1937 – Wallace H. Carothers receives a patent for nylon. Wallace Hume Carothers (April 27, 1896 – April 29, 1937) was an American chemist, inventor and the leader of organic chemistry at DuPont, credited with the invention of Nylon.

Carothers was a group leader in DuPont’s Experimental Station laboratory, near Wilmington, Delaware, where most polymer research was done. Carothers was a brilliant organic chemist who, in addition to first developing nylon, also helped lay the groundwork for Neoprene. After receiving his Ph.D, he taught at several universities before he was hired by the DuPont Company to work on fundamental research.

He married the former Helen Sweetman on February 21, 1936.  Wallace Carothers had been troubled by periods of mental depression since his youth.  Despite his success with Nylon, he felt that he had not accomplished much and had run out of ideas.  His unhappiness was compounded by the death of his favourite sister, and on April 29, 1937, he checked into a Philadelphia hotel room and died after drinking a cocktail of lemon juice laced with potassium cyanide.  His daughter, Jane, was born seven months later on November 27, 1937.

Nylon is a generic designation for a family of synthetic polymers known generically as polyamides and first produced on February 28, 1935 by Wallace Carothers at DuPont.  Nylon is one of the most commonly used polymers.

Nylon is a thermoplastic silky material, first used commercially in a nylon-bristled toothbrush (1938), followed more famously by women’s stockings (“nylons”; 1940).  It is made of repeating units linked by peptide bonds (another name for amide bonds) and is frequently referred to as polyamide (PA).  Nylon was the first commercially successful polymer.

Nylon was intended to be a synthetic replacement for silk and substituted for it in many different products after silk became scarce during World War II.  It replaced silk in military applications such as parachutes and flak vests, and was used in many types of vehicle tyres.

Nylon fibers are used in many applications, including fabrics, bridal veils, carpets, musical strings, and rope.

Solid nylon is used for mechanical parts such as machine screws, gears and other low to medium-stress components previously cast in metal. Engineering-grade nylon is processed by extrusion, casting, and injection moulding. Solid nylon is used in hair combs.  Type 6/6 Nylon 101 is the most common commercial grade of nylon, and Nylon 6 is the most common commercial grade of moulded nylon.  Nylon is available in glass-filled variants which increase structural and impact strength and rigidity, and molybdenum sulfide-filled variants which increase lubricity.

1957 – The “Toddlers’ Truce”, a controversial television close-down between 6.00pm and 7.00pm – was abolished in the United Kingdom. The Toddlers’ Truce was a piece of early British TV scheduling policy which required transmission halt for an hour each weekday from 6-7pm.  This was from the end of children’s TV and the evening schedule so that young children could be put to bed.

Background
It may have originated when the BBC resumed television after the end of the war in 1946.  The policy remained fairly uncontroversial until ITV began transmission in 1955.  At that time the Truce was accepted as policy by the Postmaster General, Earl De La Warr, in the interests of smoothing relations between ITV and the fledgling ITA.  The problem became apparent in 1956 when the ITV franchise-holders under the ITA’s jurisdiction were struggling to stay in business.  As the BBC were and still are funded by a TV licence fee, their budget was not related to the number of hours of transmission.  Indeed the Truce saved them money.  ITV, on the other hand, were funded entirely by advertising and the Truce caused a loss of revenue in the hour’s close-down.  Supporters of ITV, which had faced strong political opposition, argued that the Truce had little to do with social responsibility and was simply a way to give the BBC an unfair advantage.

Abolition
The ITA had encouraged the ITV companies (Granada, ABC Television, ATV and Associated – Rediffusion) to seek abolition of the Truce.  Action was taken finally in July 1956, probably the result of a lack of effective cooperation between the companies rather than political objection.  The Postmaster General, Charles Hill, had disliked the policy as an example of the BBC’s paternalism toward its audience, saying:

This restriction seemed to me absurd and I said so. It was the responsibility of parents, not the state, to put their children to bed at the right time… I invited the BBC and the ITA to agree to its abolition …

The BBC could not, however, be persuaded to accept the abolition or even to a compromise of reducing the period to 30 minutes.  Hill tired of the disagreement and asked Parliament for the abolition which was agreed on 31 October 1956.  However, the BBC and ITA couldn’t even agree a date for the abolition to take place.  Hill decided on Saturday, 16 February 1957.

Subsequent use of the time
The BBC filled the hour with a music programme, ‘Six-Five Special’ from the first Saturday and with the ‘Tonight’ news magazine from Monday to Friday.  The BBC however continued to close from 6.15-7.00pm on Sundays, the time of evening church services, until ‘Songs of Praise’ was launched on 1 October 1961.  Until 1992 this time on Sundays was used for religious programmes on BBC1 and ITV.  The 6-7pm slot has ever since been devoted to news, especially regional news, in the weekday schedules of both BBC1 and ITV, though ‘Crossroads’ (a Monday to Friday soap opera, no longer made) was also shown at this time in most ITV regions.

1957 – The first computer bulletin board system is created (CBBS in Chicago, Illinois). A Bulletin Board System, or BBS, is a computer system running software that allows users to connect and login to the system using a terminal program.  Originally BBSes were accessed only over a phone line using a modem, but by the early 1990s some BBSes allowed access via a Telnet, packet switched network, or packet radio connection.

Once logged in, a user could perform functions such as downloading or uploading software and data, reading news, and exchanging messages with other users, either through electronic mail or in public message boards.  Many BBSes also offered on-line games, in which users could compete with each other, and BBSes with multiple phone lines often offered chat rooms, allowing users to interact with each other.

Monochrome, a modern BBS still running today

Monochrome, a modern BBS still running today.

The term “Bulletin Board System” itself is a reference to the traditional cork-and-pin bulletin board often found in entrances of supermarkets, schools, libraries or other public areas where people can post messages, advertisements, or community news.
During their heyday from the late 1970s to the mid 1990s, most BBSes were run as a hobby free of charge by the system operator (or “SysOp”), while other BBSes charged their users a subscription fee for access, or were operated by a business as a means of supporting their customers.  Bulletin Board Systems were in many ways a precursor to the modern form of the World Wide Web and other aspects of the Internet.

Netscape BBSes

Early BBSes were often a local phenomenon, as one had to dial into a BBS with a phone line and would have to pay additional long distance charges for a BBS out of the local calling area. Thus, many users of a given BBS usually lived in the same area, and activities such as BBS Meets or Get Togethers, where everyone from the board would gather and meet face to face, were common.

As the use of the Internet became more widespread in the mid to late 1990s, traditional BBSes rapidly faded in popularity.  Today, Internet forums occupy much of the same social and technological space as BBSes did, and the term BBS is often used to refer to any online forum or message board.

1983 – The Ash Wednesday bush-fires in Victoria and South Australia claim the lives of 75 people.  The Ash Wednesday bush-fires were a series of bush-fires that occurred in south-eastern Australia on 16 February 1983.  Within twelve hours, more than 180 fires fanned by winds of up to 110 km (68 mph) per hour caused widespread destruction across the states of Victoria and South Australia.  Years of severe drought and extreme weather combined to create one of Australia’s worst fire days in a century.  The fires are the second deadliest bush-fire disaster in Australian history – only the 2009 Victorian bush-fires have claimed more lives.

Ash Wednesday is one of Australia’s costliest natural disasters.  Over 3,700 buildings were destroyed or damaged and 2,545 individuals and families lost their homes.  Livestock losses were very high, with over 340,000 sheep, 18,000 cattle and numerous native animals either dead or later destroyed.  A total of 4,540 insurance claims were paid totalling A$176 million with a total estimated cost of well over $400 million (1983 values) for both states or $1.3 billion in adjusted terms (2007).

The emergency saw the largest number of volunteers called to duty from across Australia at the same time—an estimated 130,000 firefighters, defence force personnel, relief workers and support crews.

2006 –  The last Mobile army surgical hospital (MASH) is decommissioned by the United States Army.

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Born on this Day

1878 – Pamela Colman Smith, artist, writer, designer of the Rider-Waite-Smith deck of tarot cards (d. 1951)  –  Read about and see the Rider-Waite tarot deck HERE

1909 – Richard McDonald,  – American fast food pioneer (d. 1998)

1927 – June Brown, English actress

1935 – Sonny Bono, American entertainer & U.S. Congressman (d. 1998)

1946 – Ian Lavender, English actor

1959 – John McEnroe, American tennis player

1960 – Pete Willis, English guitarist (Def Leppard)

1961 – Andy Taylor, English musician (Duran Duran, The Power Station)

External Links for more news in history of today:

BBC: On this Day

New York Times ~ On this Day

Today in Canadian History ~ 16th February.

Playtime Bell Rings!  ~

These are the jokes folks!

The first computer dates back to Adam and Eve. It was an Apple with limited memory, just one byte. And then everything crashed.

I just asked my husband if he remembers what today is …  Scaring men is SO easy.

I saw a documentary on how ships are kept together;  riveting!

Behind every very cross woman is a man who has absolutely no idea what he did wrong.

I went to a karaoke bar last night that didn’t play any 70’s music…
 at first I was afraid,  I was petrified.

If I repeatedly stab my cornflakes does that make me a  cereal killer?

My uncle has a weird hobby; he collects empty bottles…  which sounds so much better than “alcoholic.”

I went to the garden centre in December and bought a Christmas Tree.  The assistant asked me, “Will you be putting that up yourself?”  I replied,  “No, you idiot. I’ll be putting it up in my living room.

I used to be in a band called ‘Missing Cat’… you probably saw our posters.

My husband and I met at a Castanet class… we clicked.

I phoned up the spiritual leader of Tibet, he sent me a large goat with a long neck,  turns out I phoned dial-a-lama.

and finally …. I’d like to finish with a song . . . 

Don’t go bacon my heart.  I couldn’t if I fried.

❤  ❤  ❤

Time for a coffee and a moment of contemplation. . . 

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

CONFIDENCE:

Once all village people decided to pray for rain.  On the day of the prayer all the people gathered and only one boy came with an umbrella.  That’s Confidence.

TRUST:

Trust should be like the feeling of a one year old baby when you throw him in the air;  he laughs….  because he knows you will catch him.  That’s Trust.

HOPE:

Every night we go to bed, we have no assurance to get up alive the next morning, but still we have plans for the coming day . . .   That’s Hope.

Keep Confidence.

Trust others.

Never lose Hope.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

And that wraps up our Edumacation for today! 🙂

May your day be blessed with all that you need, a little of what you want, and a sprinkle of wisdom for those moments when you need it.

Thank you for coming and sharing a coffee with me.  It’s such a blessing to me that you’re here.

Sending you much love and squidges, from me in my corner, to you in yours. ~

Sig coffee copy

The Friday Post ~ 9th February 2018

Hello and a BIG WELCOME to Friday!  Comes round regular as clockwork, doesn’t it?!  But  it’s a popular day with heaps of people, so it must have something good about it, is my way of thinking.

So let’s get into the groove  [sings well-known Madonna song to self] and take our seats for some Friday Edumacation, shall we? Ready?  Sitting comfortably?   . . . .  Then lets GO!

On this Day in History

Today is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.

1870 – The U.S. Weather Bureau was established.
1895 – William G. Morgan creates a game called Mintonette
, which soon comes to be referred to as volleyball.

1900 – Davis Cup competition is established. The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in men’s tennis. The largest annual international team competition in sports, the Davis Cup is run by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and is contested between teams of players from competing countries in a knock-out format. The competition began in 1900 as a challenge between the United States and Great Britain. In 2005, 134 nations entered teams into the competition. The most successful countries over the history of the tournament are the United States (winning 32 tournaments and finishing as runners-up 29 times) and Australia (winning 28 times and finishing second 19 times and also winning on four occasions with New Zealand under the name ‘Australasia’).

The women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup is the Fed Cup.

(additional note just for fun  When I typed that last sentence instead of typing  “… Davis Cup is the Fed Cup” ….  what I actually typed by accident was: The women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup is the Fed up.”  –  Totally different meaning,  Totally an accident.  But … was it?  Could it have been a  Freudian slip,  I wonder?  LOL).

1922 – Brazil becomes a member of the Berne Convention copyright treaty. The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, usually known as the Berne Convention, is an international agreement governing copyright, which was first accepted in Berne, Switzerland in 1886.  …  Link:  Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works  (link will open in a new window)

1942 – World War II: Top United States military leaders hold their first formal meeting to discuss American military strategy in the war.
1942 – Year-round Daylight saving time is re-instated in the United States as a wartime measure to help conserve energy resources.

1950 – Second Red Scare: Senator Joseph McCarthy accuses the United States State Department of being filled with Communists. McCarthyism is a term describing the intense anti-communist suspicion in the United States in a period that lasted roughly from the late 1940’s to the late 1950’s. This period is also referred to as the Second Red Scare, and coincided with increased fears about communist influence on American institutions and espionage by Soviet agents.  Originally coined to criticise the actions of U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy, “McCarthyism” later took on a more general meaning, not necessarily referring to the conduct of Joseph McCarthy alone.

During this time many thousands of Americans were accused of being Communists or communist sympathisers and became the subject of aggressive investigations and questioning before government or private-industry panels, committees and agencies. The primary targets of such suspicions were government employees, those in the entertainment industry, educators and union activists. Suspicions were often given credence despite inconclusive or questionable evidence, and the level of threat posed by a person’s real or supposed leftist associations or beliefs was often greatly exaggerated. Many people suffered loss of employment, destruction of their careers, and even imprisonment. Most of these punishments came about through trial verdicts later overturned, laws that would be declared unconstitutional, dismissals for reasons later declared illegal or actionable, or extra-legal procedures that would come into general disrepute.

The most famous examples of McCarthyism include the Hollywood blacklist and the investigations and hearings conducted by Joseph McCarthy. It was a widespread social and cultural phenomenon that affected all levels of society and was the source of a great deal of debate and conflict in the United States.

1960 – Joanne Woodward receives the first star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an American Academy Award,  Golden Globe, Emmy and Cannes award-winning actress.  Woodward is also a television and theatrical producer.
1964 – The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a “record-busting” audience of 73 million viewers.
1965 – Vietnam War: The first United States combat troops are sent to South Vietnam.
1969 – First test flight of the Boeing 747.

1971 – The 6.4 on the Richter Scale Sylmar earthquake hits the San Fernando Valley area of California.
1971 – Apollo program: Apollo 14 returns to Earth after the third manned moon landing.

1986 – Comet Halley reaches perihelion, its closest approach to the sun, during its second visit to the inner solar system in the 20th century.

Halley’s Comet or Comet Halley (officially designated 1P/Halley) is the most famous of the periodic comets and can currently be seen every 75–76 years. Many comets with long orbital periods may appear brighter and more spectacular, but Halley is the only short-period comet that is clearly visible to the naked eye, and thus, the only naked-eye comet certain to return within a human lifetime. During its returns to the inner solar system, it has been observed by astronomers since at least 240 BC, but it was not recognized as a periodic comet until the eighteenth century when its orbit was computed by Edmond Halley, after whom the comet is now named. Halley’s Comet last appeared in the inner Solar System in 1986, and will next appear in mid-2061.

Halley is generally pronounced rhyming with valley, or (especially in the US) “Hailey”, but Edmond Halley himself probably pronounced his name “Hawley”, with the “hall-” rhyming with “tall” or “small”.

1995 – Space Shuttle astronauts Bernard A. Harris, Jr. and Michael Foale become the first African-American and first Briton, respectively, to perform spacewalks.
1996 – The Irish Republican Army (the I.R.A) declares the end of its 18 month ceasefire shortly followed by a large bomb in London’s Canary Wharf.

1996 – Copernicium is first discovered

Copernicium is a synthetic chemical element with symbol Cn and atomic number 112. It is an extremely radioactive element, and can only be created in a laboratory. The most stable known isotope, copernicium-285, has a half-life of approximately 29 seconds. Copernicium was first created in 1996 by the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research near Darmstadt, Germany.  It is named after the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus.  LINK: (opens in a new page for you);  The Periodic Table of Videos (University of Nottingham)

2001 – The American submarine USS Greeneville accidentally strikes and sinks the Ehime-Maru, a Japanese training vessel operated by the Uwajima Fishery High School.

The Ehime-Maru and USS Greeneville collision was a ship collision between the United States Navy (USN) submarine USS Greeneville (SSN-772) and the Japanese fishing training ship Ehime Maru on 9 February 2001, about 9 nautical miles (17 km) off the south coast of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. In a demonstration for some civilian visitors, Greeneville performed an emergency surfacing manoeuvre. As the submarine surfaced, it struck Ehime Maru, a high school fishing training ship from Ehime Prefecture, Japan. Within minutes of the collision, Ehime Maru sank. Nine of its crew members were killed, including four high school students.

Many Japanese, including government officials, were concerned over news that civilians were present in Greeneville’s control room at the time of the accident. Some expressed anger because of a perception that the submarine did not try to assist Ehime Maru’s survivors and that the submarine’s captain, Commander Scott Waddle, did not apologise immediately afterwards. The Navy conducted a public court of inquiry, placed blame on Waddle and other members of Greeneville’s crew, and dealt non-judicial punishment or administrative disciplinary action to the captain and some crew members.

In response to requests from the families of Ehime Maru’s victims and the government of Japan, the USN raised Ehime Maru from the ocean floor in October 2001 and moved it to shallow water near Oahu. Once there, Navy and Japanese divers located and retrieved the remains of eight of the nine victims from the wreck. Ehime Maru was then moved back out to sea and scuttled in deep water. The Navy compensated the government of Ehime Prefecture, Ehime Maru’s survivors, and victims’ family members for the accident. Waddle travelled to Japan in December 2002 to apologise to the ship’s survivors and victims’ families.

The accident renewed calls by many in Japan for the United States to make more effort to reduce or eliminate crimes and accidents involving U.S. military personnel who injure or kill Japanese citizens.  In response to the accident, the Navy changed its policies regarding civilian visits to its ships.

2016 – Two passenger trains collided in the German town of Bad Aibling in the state of Bavaria.  Twelve people died, and 85 others were injured

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Born on this Day

1789 – Franz Xaver Gabelsberger, German inventor of the stenography (d. 1849)

1907 – Harold Scott MacDonald Coxeter, English-Canadian mathematician and academic (d. 2003)

1909 – Carmen Miranda, Portuguese-Brazilian actress, singer, and dancer (d. 1955)

1909 – Heather Angel, British actress (d. 1986)

1914 – Gypsy Rose Lee, American dancer (d. 1970)

1940 – Brian Bennett, English drummer & musician (The Shadows)

1942 – Carole King, American singer

1943 – Joe Pesci, American actor

1945 – Mia Farrow, American actress

1960 – Holly Johnson, British singer (Frankie Goes to Hollywood)

1981 – Tom Hiddleston, English actor, producer, and musical performer

~  ❤  ~

Died on this Day  and remembered here

1981 – Bill Haley. –  American singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1925)

2002 – Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom (b. 1930), the Queens younger sister.

2006 – Freddie Laker – British airline entrepreneur (b. 1922)

~  ❤  ~

*PLAYTIME BELL RINGS!

THESE  are the jokes, folks!

I’d like to start with the chimney jokes  –  I’ve got a stack of them.
I had a dream last night that I was cutting carrots with the Grim Reaper  –  dicing with death.
I saw a man chatting-up a cheetah and I thought:  ‘He’s trying to pull a fast one.’
I’ve decided to sell my Hoover  –  it was just collecting dust.
I went to the local supermarket and said:  ‘I want to make a complaint – this vinegar’s got lumps in it.’   He said:  ‘Those are pickled onions’.
You know, somebody actually complimented me on my driving today.  They left a little note on the windscreen, it said  ‘Parking Fine’.   So that was nice.  😀
I was in this restaurant and I asked for something herby.  They gave me a Volkswagen with no driver.
A lot of people cry when they cut onions.  –  The trick is not to form an emotional bond.

Q. What did the little boat say to the yacht?  A. Can I interest you in a little row-mance?

 Meanwhile, in a parallel universe:  “Oh for God’s sake! Where are all these extra single socks coming from?!”

Mr. Cobs and I often laugh about how competitive we are.   But I laugh more 😉

and finally ….
did you know …..

Moses had the first tablet that could connect to the cloud!

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Now, shall we have a coffee and a moment of contemplation?  . . .

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

What would you do if you weren’t afraid?

Fear can make you stand still – and that’s not what we were made for.  Instead, use fear as a tool and not as a handicap.

Fear is inbuilt into us because it’s that wise old owl who tells us not to go too close to the edge of the cliff, because the wind could take us over it.

Fear is that little voice that tells you not to get into the bath of hot water until you’ve tested the temperature first.  Fear is that thing that is one of your guides.

However,  what fear isn’t, is a stop sign for everything.

Fear shouldn’t make you stop.  Fear should just get you to think about the possibilities for a moment and then work out the best way to go about doing what you want to do.

Fear isn’t meant to hold you in the palm of its hand and manipulate you.

If you have a fear about something, then that’s ok.  But remind yourself that you are in control.  If fear is keeping you suspended animation then step out of it.

Work out what it is that is your worst fear.  Once you know that …  put it on one side …  sort of on a shelf in your brain.  Out of the way.  Because once you know what it is, you don’t need to keep going over it,  over and over and over again.

You simply have to acknowledge what your worst fear is and once you understand it, you can get on with your life, knowing that you know what the fear is, but not letting it stop you from enjoying what life has to offer you.

Now I ask again . . .   What would you do if you weren’t afraid?

LIVE your LIFE.

Don’t live your fear.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Ok, that costly edumacation that your parents pay for is now over for another Friday.  I absolutely LOVE seeing you here, thank you so very much for coming.  It’s a total thrill to know that you’re visiting and having a read.  It makes ‘building’ this regular Friday ‘bit of fun’ all worthwhile.

Thank you to all who come for a visit, and an especially big  THANK YOU  to those who stay a few minutes to leave a bit of a chat behind.  It tickles the heck out of me when we get together on a Friday and all have a good old chin wag.

May your Friday be filled with happiness, peace and joy.  May your weekend be filled with contentment and love.  

Sending you squidges and love, from me here in my corner to you there in yours.

Sig coffee copy

The Friday Post ~ 2nd February 2018

Hello and Happy Second of February to you.  Did you say ‘White Rabbits’ yesterday?  If not, please say it right now.  This very moment.  Although it’s a little late, it might still work and give you the chance of a happy February. Just play along – even if you don’t believe.  What harm can it do, eh?

But anyhoo …  you’ve come for your Friday Edumacation Lessons, so please find your seats and settle down.  We shall begin. . . .

On this Day in History

1653 – New Amsterdam (later renamed The City of New York) is incorporated. New Amsterdam (Dutch: Nieuw Amsterdam) was a 17th century Dutch colonial settlement that later became New York City.

The town developed outside of Fort Amsterdam on Manhattan Island in the New Netherland territory (1614–1674) which was situated between 38 and 42 degrees latitude as a provincial extension of the Dutch Republic as of 1624. Provincial possession of the territory was accomplished with the first settlement which was established on Governors Island in 1624. A year later, in 1625, construction of a citadel comprising Fort Amsterdam was commenced on the southern tip of Manhattan and the first settlers were moved there from Governors Island.

Earlier, the harbour and the river had been discovered, explored and charted by an expedition of the Dutch East India Company captained by Henry Hudson in 1609. From 1611 through 1614, the territory was surveyed and charted by various private commercial companies on behalf of the States General of the Dutch Republic and operated for the interests of private commercial entities prior to official possession as a North American extension of the Dutch Republic as a provincial entity in 1624.

The town was founded in 1625 by New Netherland’s second director, Willem Verhulst who, together with his council, selected Manhattan Island as the optimal place for permanent settlement by the Dutch West India Company. That year, military engineer and surveyor Krijn Frederiksz laid out a citadel with Fort Amsterdam as centrepiece. To secure the settlers’ property and its surroundings according to Dutch law, Peter Minuit created a deed with the Manhattan Indians in 1626 which signified legal possession of Manhattan. He was appointed New Netherland’s third director by the local council after Willem Verhulst was recalled to patria and sailed away in November 1626.

The city, situated on the strategic, fortifiable southern tip of the island of Manhattan was to maintain New Netherland’s provincial integrity by defending river access to the company’s fur trade operations in the North River, later named Hudson River. Furthermore, it was entrusted to safeguard the West India Company’s exclusive access to New Netherland’s other two estuaries; the Delaware River and the Connecticut River. Fort Amsterdam was designated the capital of the province in 1625 and developed into the largest Dutch colonial settlement of the New Netherland province, now the New York Tri-State Region, and remained a Dutch possession until September 1664, when it fell provisionally and temporarily into the hands of the English.

The Dutch Republic regained it in August 1673 with a fleet of 21 ships, renaming the city New Orange. New Netherland was ceded permanently to the English in November 1674 by treaty.

The 1625 date of the founding of New Amsterdam is now commemorated in the official Seal of New York City (formerly, the year on the seal was 1664, the year of the provisional Articles of Transfer, ensuring New Netherlanders that they “shall keep and enjoy the liberty of their consciences in religion”, negotiated with the English by Petrus Stuyvesant and his council).

1709 – Alexander Selkirk is rescued from shipwreck on a desert island, inspiring the book Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe.

1812 – Russia establishes a fur trading colony at Fort Ross, California.

1887 – In Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania the first Groundhog Day is observed.

1901 – Queen Victoria’s funeral takes place. Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was from 20 June 1837 the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and from 1 May 1876 the first Empress of India of the British Raj until her death. Her reign as the Queen lasted 63 years and seven months, was longer than that of any of her predecessors.  The period centred on her reign is known as the Victorian era, a time of industrial, political, and military progress within the United Kingdom.

Queen Victoria

Though Victoria ascended the throne at a time when the United Kingdom was already an established constitutional monarchy in which the king or queen held few political powers and exercised its influence by the prime minister’s advice, she still served as a very important symbolic figure of her time. The Victorian era represented the height of the Industrial Revolution, a period of significant social, economic, and technological progress in the United Kingdom. Victoria’s reign was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire; during this period it reached its zenith, becoming the foremost global power of the time.

1922 – Ulysses by James Joyce is published. Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialised in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris.  It is considered one of the most important works of Modernist literature.

Ulysses chronicles the passage through Dublin by its main character, Leopold Bloom, during an ordinary day, June 16, 1904. The title alludes to the hero of Homer’s Odyssey (Latinised into Ulysses), and there are many parallels, both implicit and explicit, between the two works (e.g., the correspondences between Leopold Bloom and Odysseus, Molly Bloom and Penelope, and Stephen Dedalus and Telemachus). June 16 is now celebrated by Joyce’s fans worldwide as Bloomsday.

Ulysses totals about 265,000 words from a vocabulary of 30,030 words and is divided into 18 “episodes”. The book has been the subject of much controversy and scrutiny since its publication, ranging from early obscenity trials to protracted textual “Joyce Wars.” Ulysses’ stream-of-consciousness technique, careful structuring, and experimental prose—full of puns, parodies, and allusions—as well as its rich characterisations and broad humour, have made the book perhaps the most highly regarded novel in the Modernist pantheon. In 1999, the Modern Library ranked Ulysses first on its list of the 100 best English-language novels of the 20th century.

1935 – Leonarde Keeler tests the first polygraph machine.  Leonarde Keeler (1903–1949) was the co-inventor of the polygraph.

On February 2, 1935, Detective Keeler conducted the first use of his invention, the Keeler Polygraph—otherwise known as the lie detector. Keeler used the lie detector on two criminals in Portage, Wisconsin, who were later convicted of assault when the lie detector results were introduced in court.

1940 – Frank Sinatra debuts with the Tommy Dorsey orchestra.

1959 – Nine experienced ski hikers in the northern Ural Mountains in the Soviet Union die under mysterious circumstances.

1971 – Idi Amin replaces President Milton Obote as leader of Uganda.  Idi Amin Dada (c.1925 – 16 August 2003), commonly known as Idi Amin, was a Ugandan military dictator and the president of Uganda from 1971 to 1979.  Amin joined the British colonial regiment, the King’s African Rifles, in 1946, and advanced to the rank of Major General and Commander of the Ugandan Army.  He took power in a military coup in January 1971, deposing Milton Obote.  His rule was characterized by human rights abuses, political repression, ethnic persecution, extrajudicial killings and the expulsion of Asians from Uganda.  The number of people killed as a result of his regime is unknown; estimates from human rights groups range from 100,000 to 500,000.

From 1977 to 1979, Amin titled himself as “His Excellency, President for Life, Field Marshal Al Hadji Doctor Idi Amin Dada, VC, DSO, MC, Lord of All the Beasts of the Earth and Fishes of the Seas and Conqueror of the British Empire in Africa in General and Uganda in Particular.”  In 1975–1976, despite opposition, Amin became the Chairman of the Organisation of African Unity, a pan-Africanist group designed to promote solidarity of the African states.  During the 1977–1979 period, Uganda was appointed to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights.

Dissent within Uganda, and Amin’s attempt to annex the Kagera province of Tanzania in 1978, led to the Uganda-Tanzania War and the fall of his regime in 1979.  Amin fled to Libya, before relocating to Saudi Arabia in 1981, where he died in 2003.

1972 – The British embassy in Dublin is destroyed in protest over Bloody Sunday.  Bloody Sunday (Irish: Domhnach na Fola) is the term used to describe an incident in Derry, Northern Ireland, on 30 January 1972 in which 27 civil rights protesters were shot by members of the 1st Battalion of the British Parachute Regiment during a Northern Ireland Civil Rights Association march in the Bogside area of the city.   External Link:  BBC Coverage

1980 – Reports surface that FBI were targeting Congressmen in the Abscam operation.  Abscam (sometimes ABSCAM) was a United States Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) sting operation run from the FBI’s Hauppauge, Long Island, office in the late 1970s and early 1980s.  The operation initially targeted trafficking in stolen property but was converted to a public corruption investigation.

1982 – Hama Massacre: Syria attacks the town of Hama.
1989 – Soviet war in Afghanistan: The last Soviet Union armoured column leaves Kabul.
1989 – Satellite television service Sky Television plc launched.

1990 – Apartheid:  F.W. de Klerk allows the African National Congress to legally function and promises to release Nelson Mandela.

Apartheid (meaning separateness in Afrikaans cognate to English apart and hood) was a system of legal racial segregation enforced by the National Party government of South Africa between 1948 and 1994.  Apartheid had its roots in the history of colonisation and settlement of southern Africa, with the development of practices and policies of separation along racial lines and domination by European settlers and their descendants.  Following the general election of 1948, the National Party set in place its programme of Apartheid, with the formalisation and expansion of existing policies and practices into a system of institutionalised racism and white domination.

Apartheid was dismantled in a series of negotiations from 1990 to 1993, culminating in elections in 1994, the first in South Africa with universal suffrage.  The vestiges of apartheid still shape South African politics and society.  External Link:  Apartheid at Wikipedia

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Born on this Day

1585 – Judith Quiney.  William Shakespeare’s youngest daughter (d. 1662)

1585 – Hamnet Shakespeare.  William Shakespeare’s only son (d. 1596)

1650 – Nell Gwynne, English actress and royal mistress (d. 1687

1882 – James Joyce, Irish author (d. 1941)

1925 – Elaine Stritch, American actress (d. 2014)

1931 – Les Dawson, British comedian (d. 1993)

1940 – David Jason, English actor

1942 – Graham Nash,  British-born American musician – born in Lancashire, England and known for his light tenor vocals and for his songwriting contributions with the British pop group The Hollies, and with the folk-rock band Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

1944 – Geoffrey Hughes, British actor. (d.  27 July 2012).  Mr. Hughes provided the voice of Paul McCartney in the 1968 animated film Yellow Submarine, and rose to fame for portraying much-loved binman Eddie Yeats in the British soap: Coronation Street. He also appeared in the popular British television sitcom Keeping Up Appearances,  playing lovable slob Onslow – husband of Daisy, who was the sister of thewonderful social-climbing snob Hyacinth Bucket (pronounced ‘Bouquet’).  Daisy was the sister without the  large house, Mercedes, sauna, Jacuzzi, swimming pool and Daisy didn’t have room for a pony either.   It was sister Violet who had all these things – plus she also had a musical bidet.   (I include this information for those of us who are lovers of the programme – and I know there are plenty of us! lol)

1947 – Farrah Fawcett, American actress (d. 2009)

1954 – Christie Brinkley, American model

1963 – Eva Cassidy, American singer (d. 1996)

1972 – Dana International, Israeli singer.

1977 – Shakira, Colombian singer

Died on this Day and remembered here

1969 – Boris Karloff, English actor (b. 1887)

1970 – Bertrand Russell, English mathematician and philosopher, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1872)

1979 – Sid Vicious, English musician (Sex Pistols) (b. 1957)

1980 – William Howard Stein, American biochemist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1911)

1987 – Alistair MacLean, Scottish novelist and screenwriter (b. 1922)

1995 – Fred Perry, British former tennis player (b. 1909)

1995 – Donald Pleasence, English actor (b. 1919)

1996 – Gene Kelly, American dancer, actor, and director (b. 1912)

2007 – Billy Henderson, American singer (The Spinners) (b. 1939)

[end of school bell sounds]

PLAYTIME!  (These are the jokes folks!)

Two male friends talking to each other, and the one says:  “I’m certain there are female hormones in beer. When I drink too much, I talk nonsense and I cannot control my car”.

I’ve read so many horrible things about eating chocolate and drinking wine recently that I made a new, firm New Year’s resolution: NO MORE READING!

Has anyone else noticed that the  ‘&’  symbol looks like a dog dragging its bottom over the floor?

I heard the Secret Service had to change their commands.  They can’t say “Get down!” anymore when the President is under attack.   Now it’s “Donald! Duck!”

Two immigrants arrive in the United States and are discussing the difference between their country and the U.S.

One of them mentions he’s heard that people in the U.S. eat dogs, and if they’re going to fit in, they better eat dogs as well.  So they head to the nearest hot dog stand and order two ‘dogs.’

The first guy unwraps his, looks at it, and nervously looks at his friend.

“Which part did you get?”

Four elephants go for a walk on a stormy day. They only have one umbrella between them. How come they none of them get wet?

Well did anybody say it was raining?

Thought for the Day

Did you know that in an average day it’s estimated that we have roughly 60,000 thoughts?  I wonder, out of all those thoughts, how many of them are happy ones. 

I know, for myself, that happy thoughts create happy perceptions.  I know that when I’m happy, I seem to have this glow.  People seem to notice something about me – I have no idea what it is, but this happy feeling inside seems to show and glow on the outside of me.  I also seem to be able to conjure up this never-ending circle of happiness that just attracts more happiness into my life.

However, I also know that if I think negatively, or are pestering over something, worrying, or am angry or fearful about something, all the warmth goes out of my life.  And that ‘glow’ that I have when I’m happy, seems to totally disappear.

If we think negatively, or are angry or fearful, then those feelings seem to take us away from our pathway in life.  These negative thoughts seem to strip us of all of our power and out ability to negotiate life effectively  We seem to become afraid of everything and even act defensively in some situations that normally, we wouldn’t.  In return, this pushes away all the good things in life, like friends and the ability to see possibilities and then we just become even more negative which eventually leads to us being lonely and even more negative.  It’s like a vicious circle.

So …  I guess that the way to a happy you, is via your thoughts.  Not just because you instantly begin to feel better and brighter, but you also become stronger and have a more solid and stable foundation to your whole life.

Have a happy day, think happy …  and remember that you’re in control of those thoughts, not the other way round. 

You won’t be bounced around by life if you’re in the driving seat!

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Well that’s me done and dusted.  All that’s left for me to say is …  Thank you so much for coming and having a coffee moment with me.

May your day be blessed with peace, joy and all those things which will make your face smile and your heart happy.

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The Friday Post ~ 26th January 2018

Hello dear pals . . .  happy last Thursday in January 2018.  In part, this month has flown past at great speed…  but at about the 22nd something changed and since then it’s slowed down somewhat.  Oddest thing, but I can’t explain it better than that.  (But then …  I’m an odd thing myself and I can’t explain ‘me’ either!  lol)

Right …. let the EDUMACATION BEGIN!

Today is Australia Day, also known as Anniversary Day and Foundation Day.

Australia day is the national day of Australia, and has been an official public holiday since 1994.  Celebrated annually on 26th January, the day commemorates the arrival of the First Fleet in 1788, marking the start of British colonisation of Australia.  Records of the celebration of Australia Day date back to 1808, with Governor Lachlan Macquarie having held the first official celebration of Australia Day in 1818

On this Day in History

1340 – King Edward III of England is declared King of France.

1500 – Vicente Yáñez Pinzón becomes the first European to set foot on Brazil. Vicente Yáñez Pinzón (Palos de la Frontera (Spain) c. 1460 – after 1523) was a Spanish navigator, explorer, and conquistador. Along with his older brother Martín Alonso Pinzón, he sailed with Christopher Columbus on the first voyage to the New World in 1492, as captain of the Niña.

1565 – Battle of Talikota, fought between the Vijayanagara Empire and the Islamic sultanates of the Deccan, leads to the subjugation, and eventual destruction of the last Hindu kingdom in India, and the consolidation of Islamic rule over much of the Indian subcontinent.

1788 – The British First Fleet, led by Arthur Phillip, sails into Port Jackson (Sydney Harbour) to establish Sydney, the first permanent European settlement on the continent. Commemorated as Australia Day.

1808 – Rum Rebellion, the only successful (albeit short-lived) armed takeover of the government in Australia. The Rum Rebellion, also known as the Rum Puncheon Rebellion, of 1808 was the only successful armed takeover of government in Australia’s recorded history. The Governor of New South Wales, William Bligh, was deposed by the New South Wales Corps under the command of Major George Johnston, working closely with John MacArthur, on 26 January 1808, 20 years to the day after Arthur Phillip founded European settlement in Australia.

Afterwards, the colony was ruled by the military, with the senior military officer stationed in Sydney purporting to act as the Lieutenant-Governor of the colony until the arrival from Britain of Major-General Lachlan Macquarie as the new Governor at the beginning of 1810.

1837 – Michigan is admitted as the 26th U.S. state.

1841 – James Bremer takes formal possession of Hong Kong Island at what is now Possession Point, establishing British Hong Kong.

1905 – The Cullinan Diamond – the world’s largest Diamond ever – is found near Pretoria, South Africa at the Premier Mine.  Weighing at 3,106.75 carats (621.35 g or 1.3698 pounds).   It was named after Thomas Cullinan, the mine’s chairman.

In April 1905, the diamond was put on sale in London, but despite considerable interest, it was still unsold after two years. In 1907 the Transvaal Colony government bought the Cullinan and presented it to King Edward VII on his 66th birthday.

Cullinan produced stones of various cuts and sizes, the largest of which is named Cullinan I or the Great Star of Africa, and at 530.4 carats (106.08 g) it is the largest clear-cut diamond in the world. Cullinan I is mounted in the head of the Sovereign’s Sceptre with Cross. The second-largest is Cullinan II or the Second Star of Africa, weighing 317.4 carats (63.48 g), mounted in the Imperial State Crown. Both diamonds are part of the Crown Jewels of the United Kingdom.

Seven other major diamonds, weighing a total of 208.29 carats (41.66 g), are privately owned by Queen Elizabeth II, who inherited them from her grandmother, Queen Mary, in 1953. The Queen also owns minor brilliants and a set of unpolished fragments.

Anecdotes
In 1905, transport from South Africa to England posed a bit of a security problem. Detectives from London were placed on a steamer ship that was rumoured to carry the stone, but this was a diversionary tactic.  The stone on that ship was a fake, meant to attract those who would be interested in stealing it.  The actual diamond was sent to England in a plain box via parcel post, albeit registered mail.

The story goes that when the diamond was split, the knife broke during the first attempt. “The tale is told of Joseph Asscher, the greatest cleaver of the day,” wrote Matthew Hart in his book Diamond: A Journey to the Heart of an Obsession, “that when he prepared to cleave the largest diamond ever known, the 3,106 carat (632 g) Cullinan, he had a doctor and nurse standing by and when he finally struck the diamond and it broke perfectly in two, he fainted dead away.” It turns out the fainting story is a popular myth. Diamond historian Lord Ian Balfour wrote that it was much more likely he opened a bottle of champagne, instead.

Rumours abound of a “second half” of the Cullinan diamond. According to Sir William Crookes the original, uncut diamond was itself “a fragment, probably less than half, of a distorted octahedral crystal; the other portions still await discovery by some fortunate miner“. Crookes thus indirectly indicates that the original, larger crystal broke in a natural way and not by a man-made cut. Others have speculated that before Frederick Wells sold the diamond to Sir Thomas Cullinan he broke off a piece which sized in at about 1,500 to 2,000 carats (300 to 400 g).

External Links:  Elizabeth II’s Jewels   …  The Cullinan Diamond …  and …  The Home of The Royal Family

1907 – The Short Magazine Lee-Enfield Mk III is officially introduced into British Military Service, and remains the oldest military rifle still in official use.

1911 – Glenn H. Curtiss flies the first successful American seaplane.

1915 – The Rocky Mountain National Park is established by an act of the U.S. Congress.

1920 – Former Ford Motor Co. executive Henry Leland launches the Lincoln Motor Company which he later sold to his former employer.

1926 – The first demonstration of the television by John Logie Baird.

John Logie Baird was a Scottish engineer, innovator, one of the inventors of the mechanical television, demonstrating the first working television system on 26 January 1926, – and inventor of both the first publicly demonstrated colour television system, and the first purely electronic colour television picture tube.

1934 – The Apollo Theatre reopens in Harlem, New York City. The Apollo Theatre in New York City is one of the most famous clubs for popular music in the United States.

1961 – John F. Kennedy appoints Janet G. Travell to be his physician. This is the first time a woman holds this appointment.
1962 – Ranger program: Ranger 3 is launched to study the moon. The space probe later missed the moon by 22,000 miles (35,400 km).
1965 – Hindi becomes the official language of India.

1966 – The Beaumont Children go missing from Glenelg Beach near Adelaide, South Australia.  Jane Nartare Beaumont (aged 9), Arnna Kathleen Beaumont (aged 7), and Grant Ellis Beaumont (aged 4) were three siblings who disappeared without a trace from a beach near Adelaide, South Australia in 1966.  Known collectively as The Beaumont Children, their case resulted in the largest police investigation in Australian criminal history, and remains Australia’s most infamous unsolved cold case.

1978 – The Great Blizzard of 1978, a rare severe blizzard with the lowest non-tropical atmospheric pressure ever recorded in the US, strikes the Ohio – Great Lakes region with heavy snow and winds up to 100 mph (161 km/h).

1988 – Andrew Lloyd Webber’s The Phantom of the Opera has its first performance on Broadway, at the Majestic Theatre in New York.

1992 – Boris Yeltsin announces that Russia is going to stop targeting United States cities with nuclear weapons.
1998 – Lewinsky scandal: On American television, U.S. President Bill Clinton denies having had “sexual relations” with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.

2001 –  The 7.7 Mw Gujarat earthquake shakes Western India with a maximum Mercalli intensity of X (Extreme), leaving 13,805–20,023 dead and about 166,800 injured.

2006 – Western Union discontinues use of its telegram service.

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Born on this Day

1857 – the 12th Dalai Lama (d. 1875)

1880 – Douglas MacArthur, American general and Medal of Honor recipient (d. 1964)

1904 – Ancel Keys, American scientist (d. 2004)

1905 – Maria von Trapp, Austrian-born singer (d. 1987)

1908 – Jill Esmond, English actress (d. 1990)

1922 – Michael Bentine, British comedian (d. 1996)

1925 –  Paul Newman, American actor, activist, director, race car driver, and businessman, co-founded Newman’s Own (d. 2008)

1958 – Anita Baker, American singer

1958 – Ellen DeGeneres, American actress and comedian

1963 – Andrew Ridgeley, English musician

1967 – Col Needham, English businessman, co-founded – ‘Internet Movie Database’

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Died on this day and remembered here:

1795 – Johann Christoph Friedrich Bach, German composer (b. 1732)

1973 – Edward G. Robinson, American actor (b. 1893)

1979 – Nelson Rockefeller, 41st Vice President of the United States (b. 1908)

2008 – Christian Brando, actor and son of Marlon Brando (b. 1958)

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Well that’s it.  Schools over.  But ….  now we have . . .  PLAYTIME!

These are the jokes, folks!  …

Did you hear about the actor who fell through the floorboards?  He was just going through a stage!

My dog ate all the scrabble tiles, and now he keeps leaving little messages all around the house.

Have you visited that new restaurant yet?  The one called Karma?  There’s no menu, you just get what you deserve.

Why don’t scientists trust atoms?  Because they make up everything.

Why did the chicken go to the séance?  To get to the other side.

Where are average things manufactured?  The Satisfactory.

What sits at the bottom of the sea and twitches?  A nervous wreck.

What kind of exercise do lazy people do?  Diddly Squats.

What does Charles Dickens keep in his spice rack?   The Best of Thymes,  The Worst of Thymes.

Harry prays to God:  “Dear Lord, please make me win the lottery”.

The next day Harry begs the Lord again:  “Please make it so I win the lottery, Lord!”

The next day, Harry again prays:  “Please, please, dear Lord, make me win the lottery!”

Suddenly he hears a voice from above:   “Harry, would you kindly go and buy a lottery ticket.”

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Thought for the Day

Bucket Lists.  I don’t believe in having ‘Bucket Lists’.  Why would a person make a list of things they want to do, when there’s so much to do in life anyway?  Why limit your life to a shopping list?

Your life is happening NOW.  Don’t miss a thing.  Don’t miss going outside and seeing the colour of the grass.  Don’t think about seeing XYZ in another country when you haven’t even seen to the bottom of your own back garden!  Why long to visit Buckingham Palace and see the Queen, when you haven’t even seen your own Aunt for ….  how long was that?  

Instead of a bucket list, lets throw that list in the bin and make a sign instead.  A sign, on a piece of A4 (or something bigger if you have it), and pin it up where you can see it every single morning, without fail.

On that piece of paper, write: 

LIFE BEGINS TODAY.

 

Seize the day …. make the most of the present and stop thinking about next week, next month, next year, sometime in the future.  Live NOWRight now.  You could be run over by a bus any day soon.

Don’t let your last thoughts be:  I wish I’d have appreciated the colours of the pansies my mom grew.  –  I wish I’d have visited a coffee-house weekly and ordered a different coffee (or tea) every single time I went, so that I could experience them all.

Do as much as you possibly can now.  Right now.  Because you don’t know that everything will fall into place for that shopping list you fondly call your ‘Bucket List’.  Benefit your life now,  . . .  because:  LIFE BEGINS TODAY.

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Well that’s me done and dusted.   😀

All that’s left for me to do now is  wish you a truly wonderful weekend.  May you find some magical smiles this weekend. And … may the coming week, the last few days of January, bring you peace and joy.  The earth is warming up – although I know that some of you might not think it is … but it is.  I can feel it happening.  Spring is on its way …. unless of course, you live in Australia or one of the other places upon Earth which are just about to leave their summer and go into Autumn.

Thank you so much for coming and having a coffee with me. Sending you much love and a big bucket of squidges ~

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