The Friday Post ~ History of Events on 16th March

Good Morning,  and a very Happy Friday to one and all.  We are, today, 75 days into 2018 – which means that there’s 283 till Christmas.  Now don’t you feel better now you’ve had an early warning about this special date rushing towards us?  You’ll be able to miss the crush of shoppers in December, simply because you have a lovely blogging friend who gives you these early warnings!

You’re welcome.  😀

Anyhoo . . .  you’ve come for a little Edumacation Cobwebs Style, so … shall we get on with it?

16th March 2018

On this Day in History

1689 – The 23rd Regiment of Foot or Royal Welch Fusiliers is founded.

1802 – The Army Corps of Engineers is established to found and operate the United States Military Academy at West Point.

1815 – Prince Willem proclaims himself King of the United Kingdom of the Netherlands, the first constitutional monarch in the Netherlands.

1830 – London’s re-organised police force (Scotland Yard) forms.  New Scotland Yard (NSY) is the headquarters of the Metropolitan Police Service, responsible for law enforcement within Greater London, excluding the City district, which is covered by the City of London Police.

1867 – First publication of an article by Joseph Lister outlining the discovery of antiseptic surgery, in The Lancet.

1870 – The first version of the overture fantasy Romeo and Juliet  by Tchaikovsky receives its premiere performance.

1872 – The Wanderers F.C. won the first FA Cup, the oldest football competition in the world, beating Royal Engineers A.F.C. 1-0 at The Oval in Kennington, London.

1918 – Geoffrey O’Hara’s “K-K-K-Katy” song was published.  “K-K-K-Katy” was a popular World War I-era song written by Canadian American composer Geoffrey O’Hara in 1917 and published in 1918. The sheet music advertised it as “The Sensational Stammering Song Success Sung by the Soldiers and Sailors”.

The lyrics tell of a brave but awkward soldier called Jimmy who is lovesick over the beautiful Katy. He buys a wedding ring before going to fight in France.  It was a top 20 song from May 1918 to January 1919 and was number 1 from July to September.

1926 – History of Rocketry: Robert Goddard launches the first liquid-fuelled rocket, at Auburn, Massachusetts, it travels 184′ (56 meters).

1935 – Adolf Hitler orders Germany to rearm herself in violation of the Treaty of Versailles. Conscription is reintroduced to form the Wehrmacht.

1939 – From Prague Castle, Hitler proclaims Bohemia and Moravia a German protectorate.

1940 – First person killed (James Isbister) in a German bombing raid on the UK in World War II during a raid on Scapa Flow in the Orkney Islands.

1958 – The Ford Motor Company produces its 50 millionth automobile, the Thunderbird, averaging almost a million cars a year since the company’s founding.

1962 – A Flying Tiger Line Super Constellation (a propeller-driven, four-engined airliner) disappears in the western Pacific Ocean, with all 107 aboard missing and presumed dead.

1964 – Capitol released the Beatles record “Can’t Buy Me Lovebacked with “You Can’t Do That”.

1968 – General Motors produces its 100 millionth automobile, the Oldsmobile Toronado.

1972 – John & Yoko are served with deportation papers.  The Nixon Administration tried to have Lennon deported from the U.S., as Richard Nixon believed that Lennon’s proactive antiwar activities and support for George McGovern could cost him re-election.  Republican Senator Strom Thurmond suggested, in a February 1972 memo, that “deportation would be a strategic counter-measure” against Lennon.  The next month the Immigration and Naturalisation Service began deportation proceedings against Lennon, arguing that his 1968 misdemeanour conviction for cannabis possession in London had made him ineligible for admission to the U.S. Lennon spent the next four years in deportation hearings.

1976 – UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson resigned. Harold Wilson, Labour leader for 13 years and prime minister for almost eight, stunned the political world by announcing his resignation. Mr Wilson, who had turned 60 five days previously, made his bombshell announcement to his Cabinet that morning.
BBC News story on the Day complete with video footage.

1978 – Supertanker Amoco Cadiz splits in two after running aground on the Portsall Rocks, three miles off the coast of Brittany, resulting in the 5th largest oil spill in history.

1985 – Associated Press newsman Terry Anderson is taken hostage in Beirut. He is released on December 4, 1991.
1988 – Iran-Contra Affair: Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North and Vice Admiral John Poindexter are indicted on charges of conspiracy to defraud the United States.

1988 – American off-road racing legend Mickey Thompson, and his wife Trudy were shot to death in their driveway. Thompson, known as the “Speed King,” set nearly 500 auto speed endurance records including being the first person to travel more than 400 mph on land.

On March 16, 1988 Mickey Thompson and his wife were killed by two gunmen at their home in Bradbury, California in the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains.

An intense police investigation led nowhere until thirteen years after their deaths when former business partner Michael Frank Goodwin was charged in Orange County, California with the murders.  However, that case was overturned on jurisdictional grounds by the California District Court of Appeal.  On June 8, 2004, Goodwin was formally charged in Pasadena in Los Angeles County. In October 2006, a Pasadena Superior Court judge ordered Goodwin to stand trial for the murders.

On January 4, 2007 a jury found Michael Goodwin guilty of two counts of murder in the death of Mickey Thompson and his wife.  Goodwin was sentenced to two consecutive life-without-parole terms for the murders of Thompson and his wife. The judge also denied Goodwin’s motion for a new trial.

1994 – Tonya Harding plead guilty in Portland, OR, to conspiracy to hinder prosecution for covering up the attack on her skating rival Nancy Kerrigan. She was fined $100,000. She was also banned from amateur figure skating.

1995 – Mississippi formally ratifies the Thirteenth Amendment, becoming the last state to approve the abolition of slavery.  The Thirteenth Amendment was officially ratified in 1865.

2001 – A series of bomb blasts that took place in the city of Shijiazhuang, China killed 108 people and injured 38 others, was the biggest mass murder in China in decades.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Born on this Day

1789 – Georg Simon Ohm, German physicist (d. 1854) (discovered Ohm’s Law)

1839 – John Butler Yeats, Irish painter (d. 1922)

1856 – Napoléon Eugène, Prince Imperial, only child of Emperor Napoleon III of France (d. 1879)

1920 – Leo McKern, Australian-English actor (d. 2002)

1926 – Jerry Lewis, American comedian (d. 2017)

1948 – Michael Bruce, American musician (Alice Cooper)

1949 – Erik Estrada, Puerto Rican actor

1954 – Jimmy Nail, British actor and singer

1959 – Flavor Flav, American rapper, and reality tv star

1959 – Greg Dyer, Australian cricketer

1960 – Jenny Eclair, English comedian, actress and screenwriter

1961 – Todd McFarlane, Canadian comic book artist, writer and media entrepreneur, founded McFarlane Toys

1963 – Jerome Flynn, English actor and singer

1984 – Aisling Bea, Irish comedienne and actress

Died on this Day and remembered here

1970 – Tammi Terrell, American singer (b. 1945)

1975 – T-Bone Walker, American singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1910)

1983 – Arthur Godfrey, American actor and television host (b. 1903)

1998 – Derek Barton, English-American chemist and academic, Nobel Prize laureate (b. 1918)

2003 – Rachel Corrie, American activist (b. 1979)

2003 – Ronald Ferguson, English captain, polo player, and manager (b. 1931) (father of Sarah Ferguson)

2013 – Frank Thornton, English actor (b. 1921) (perhaps known best for playing Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served?)

2014 – Steve Moore, English author and illustrator (b. 1949)

2016 – Frank Sinatra, Jr., American singer and actor (b. 1944) ( son of singer and actor Frank Sinatra)

PLAYTIME BELL RINGS ..  ~  ..  TIME FOR FUN!

These are the jokes folks ….

Conjunctivitis.com – that’s a site for sore eyes

Police arrested two kids yesterday. One was drinking battery acid, the other was eating fireworks. They charged one and let the other one off.

I usually meet my friend at 12:59 – because I like that one-to-one time.

Is it possible to mistake schizophrenia for telepathy?  I hear you ask.

As a child I was made to walk the plank. We couldn’t afford a dog.

Whenever I see a man with a beard, moustache and glasses, I think,  ‘There’s a man who has taken every precaution to avoid people doodling on photographs of him’

I needed a password eight characters long so I picked  Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.

And now it’s coffee and contemplation time . . .

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

If our eyes saw only souls instead of bodies, how differently do you think you’d actually see people?  Would you be able, I wonder, to see the struggles that they’ve been through, or are going through?  Would you be able to see that their outer persona of being  ‘non-approachable’  was actually just a self-protection thing, because of the amount of hurt and pain that person had suffered at the hands of others, and that in reality he/she was a soft gentle person with a heart which is able to love the world twice over?

If you saw only the soul of a person – would you still see the moody, aggressive teenager, or would you see the child they still were, and the bullying which they were experiencing at the hands of someone else?

If her soul presented itself to you next time you saw your mother –  would you see her as a nag who was constantly telling you how you need to __________ [fill in the blank space].  Or would you see how her love and concern for you is as strong today as it was the moment you were born, and what she’s actually doing now is simply trying to guide and protect you, because her love for you is all-encompassing?

This wonderful gift of seeing someone’s soul rather than seeing their ‘over-coat’ or body – is something we all need to put into action.  We need to use it as the tool which was actually given to us all at birth – but we’ve all forgotten how to do it.

So I’m here to gently push you into seeing the souls of people, instead of their ‘over-coat’.  It’s an easy enough thing to do.  Just remind yourself all the time to see the soul not the body – until eventually you won’t need to remind yourself for it will come naturally to you – just as breathing in and out does!

You’ll learn so much more, and you’ll treat people with more kindness, love, and understanding,  by seeing their soul, rather than their body.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Well schools out and we’ve finished out Edumacation for this week.  I hope you’ve learned something that you can take out into the world and share with someone else.  People are going to think you’re oh SO clever!

This week has been a busy one here in Cobweb Towers.  phew!  Between Doctors appointments, hospital appointments, garage (car) visits,  Little Cobs visiting, (which is always a joy, but cooo,  he’s a Grammy Exhaustion Factory in one small boy!)  – and then, just to make sure that the cake had a cherry on the top:  the dishwasher turned its toes up and died.

Mr.Cobs says he doesn’t think we need to buy a new one because, he says, he really rather likes washing the dishes.  I’m not sure if I passed out at this point but I do feel that several hours are missing from that point.   We shall see if he changes his mind, and in the meantime I’ll do a bit of looking around the internet to see what’s on offer – just in case.

Well … that’s me done and dusted.  I shall hang my school teachers cap and gown up for another week and become the child I really am for the rest of the time.  😀

May your Friday be joyful, may your weekend be filled with warm smiles.  And may you find contentment nestling in your heart.

Sending squidges  … 

Sig coffee copy

 

 

The Friday Post ~ 9th February 2018

Hello and a BIG WELCOME to Friday!  Comes round regular as clockwork, doesn’t it?!  But  it’s a popular day with heaps of people, so it must have something good about it, is my way of thinking.

So let’s get into the groove  [sings well-known Madonna song to self] and take our seats for some Friday Edumacation, shall we? Ready?  Sitting comfortably?   . . . .  Then lets GO!

On this Day in History

Today is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.

1870 – The U.S. Weather Bureau was established.
1895 – William G. Morgan creates a game called Mintonette
, which soon comes to be referred to as volleyball.

1900 – Davis Cup competition is established. The Davis Cup is the premier international team event in men’s tennis. The largest annual international team competition in sports, the Davis Cup is run by the International Tennis Federation (ITF) and is contested between teams of players from competing countries in a knock-out format. The competition began in 1900 as a challenge between the United States and Great Britain. In 2005, 134 nations entered teams into the competition. The most successful countries over the history of the tournament are the United States (winning 32 tournaments and finishing as runners-up 29 times) and Australia (winning 28 times and finishing second 19 times and also winning on four occasions with New Zealand under the name ‘Australasia’).

The women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup is the Fed Cup.

(additional note just for fun  When I typed that last sentence instead of typing  “… Davis Cup is the Fed Cup” ….  what I actually typed by accident was: The women’s equivalent of the Davis Cup is the Fed up.”  –  Totally different meaning,  Totally an accident.  But … was it?  Could it have been a  Freudian slip,  I wonder?  LOL).

1922 – Brazil becomes a member of the Berne Convention copyright treaty. The Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works, usually known as the Berne Convention, is an international agreement governing copyright, which was first accepted in Berne, Switzerland in 1886.  …  Link:  Berne Convention for the Protection of Literary and Artistic Works  (link will open in a new window)

1942 – World War II: Top United States military leaders hold their first formal meeting to discuss American military strategy in the war.
1942 – Year-round Daylight saving time is re-instated in the United States as a wartime measure to help conserve energy resources.

1950 – Second Red Scare: Senator Joseph McCarthy accuses the United States State Department of being filled with Communists. McCarthyism is a term describing the intense anti-communist suspicion in the United States in a period that lasted roughly from the late 1940’s to the late 1950’s. This period is also referred to as the Second Red Scare, and coincided with increased fears about communist influence on American institutions and espionage by Soviet agents.  Originally coined to criticise the actions of U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy, “McCarthyism” later took on a more general meaning, not necessarily referring to the conduct of Joseph McCarthy alone.

During this time many thousands of Americans were accused of being Communists or communist sympathisers and became the subject of aggressive investigations and questioning before government or private-industry panels, committees and agencies. The primary targets of such suspicions were government employees, those in the entertainment industry, educators and union activists. Suspicions were often given credence despite inconclusive or questionable evidence, and the level of threat posed by a person’s real or supposed leftist associations or beliefs was often greatly exaggerated. Many people suffered loss of employment, destruction of their careers, and even imprisonment. Most of these punishments came about through trial verdicts later overturned, laws that would be declared unconstitutional, dismissals for reasons later declared illegal or actionable, or extra-legal procedures that would come into general disrepute.

The most famous examples of McCarthyism include the Hollywood blacklist and the investigations and hearings conducted by Joseph McCarthy. It was a widespread social and cultural phenomenon that affected all levels of society and was the source of a great deal of debate and conflict in the United States.

1960 – Joanne Woodward receives the first star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Joanne Gignilliat Trimmier Woodward (born February 27, 1930) is an American Academy Award,  Golden Globe, Emmy and Cannes award-winning actress.  Woodward is also a television and theatrical producer.
1964 – The Beatles make their first appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show, performing before a “record-busting” audience of 73 million viewers.
1965 – Vietnam War: The first United States combat troops are sent to South Vietnam.
1969 – First test flight of the Boeing 747.

1971 – The 6.4 on the Richter Scale Sylmar earthquake hits the San Fernando Valley area of California.
1971 – Apollo program: Apollo 14 returns to Earth after the third manned moon landing.

1986 – Comet Halley reaches perihelion, its closest approach to the sun, during its second visit to the inner solar system in the 20th century.

Halley’s Comet or Comet Halley (officially designated 1P/Halley) is the most famous of the periodic comets and can currently be seen every 75–76 years. Many comets with long orbital periods may appear brighter and more spectacular, but Halley is the only short-period comet that is clearly visible to the naked eye, and thus, the only naked-eye comet certain to return within a human lifetime. During its returns to the inner solar system, it has been observed by astronomers since at least 240 BC, but it was not recognized as a periodic comet until the eighteenth century when its orbit was computed by Edmond Halley, after whom the comet is now named. Halley’s Comet last appeared in the inner Solar System in 1986, and will next appear in mid-2061.

Halley is generally pronounced rhyming with valley, or (especially in the US) “Hailey”, but Edmond Halley himself probably pronounced his name “Hawley”, with the “hall-” rhyming with “tall” or “small”.

1995 – Space Shuttle astronauts Bernard A. Harris, Jr. and Michael Foale become the first African-American and first Briton, respectively, to perform spacewalks.
1996 – The Irish Republican Army (the I.R.A) declares the end of its 18 month ceasefire shortly followed by a large bomb in London’s Canary Wharf.

1996 – Copernicium is first discovered

Copernicium is a synthetic chemical element with symbol Cn and atomic number 112. It is an extremely radioactive element, and can only be created in a laboratory. The most stable known isotope, copernicium-285, has a half-life of approximately 29 seconds. Copernicium was first created in 1996 by the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research near Darmstadt, Germany.  It is named after the astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus.  LINK: (opens in a new page for you);  The Periodic Table of Videos (University of Nottingham)

2001 – The American submarine USS Greeneville accidentally strikes and sinks the Ehime-Maru, a Japanese training vessel operated by the Uwajima Fishery High School.

The Ehime-Maru and USS Greeneville collision was a ship collision between the United States Navy (USN) submarine USS Greeneville (SSN-772) and the Japanese fishing training ship Ehime Maru on 9 February 2001, about 9 nautical miles (17 km) off the south coast of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. In a demonstration for some civilian visitors, Greeneville performed an emergency surfacing manoeuvre. As the submarine surfaced, it struck Ehime Maru, a high school fishing training ship from Ehime Prefecture, Japan. Within minutes of the collision, Ehime Maru sank. Nine of its crew members were killed, including four high school students.

Many Japanese, including government officials, were concerned over news that civilians were present in Greeneville’s control room at the time of the accident. Some expressed anger because of a perception that the submarine did not try to assist Ehime Maru’s survivors and that the submarine’s captain, Commander Scott Waddle, did not apologise immediately afterwards. The Navy conducted a public court of inquiry, placed blame on Waddle and other members of Greeneville’s crew, and dealt non-judicial punishment or administrative disciplinary action to the captain and some crew members.

In response to requests from the families of Ehime Maru’s victims and the government of Japan, the USN raised Ehime Maru from the ocean floor in October 2001 and moved it to shallow water near Oahu. Once there, Navy and Japanese divers located and retrieved the remains of eight of the nine victims from the wreck. Ehime Maru was then moved back out to sea and scuttled in deep water. The Navy compensated the government of Ehime Prefecture, Ehime Maru’s survivors, and victims’ family members for the accident. Waddle travelled to Japan in December 2002 to apologise to the ship’s survivors and victims’ families.

The accident renewed calls by many in Japan for the United States to make more effort to reduce or eliminate crimes and accidents involving U.S. military personnel who injure or kill Japanese citizens.  In response to the accident, the Navy changed its policies regarding civilian visits to its ships.

2016 – Two passenger trains collided in the German town of Bad Aibling in the state of Bavaria.  Twelve people died, and 85 others were injured

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Born on this Day

1789 – Franz Xaver Gabelsberger, German inventor of the stenography (d. 1849)

1907 – Harold Scott MacDonald Coxeter, English-Canadian mathematician and academic (d. 2003)

1909 – Carmen Miranda, Portuguese-Brazilian actress, singer, and dancer (d. 1955)

1909 – Heather Angel, British actress (d. 1986)

1914 – Gypsy Rose Lee, American dancer (d. 1970)

1940 – Brian Bennett, English drummer & musician (The Shadows)

1942 – Carole King, American singer

1943 – Joe Pesci, American actor

1945 – Mia Farrow, American actress

1960 – Holly Johnson, British singer (Frankie Goes to Hollywood)

1981 – Tom Hiddleston, English actor, producer, and musical performer

~  ❤  ~

Died on this Day  and remembered here

1981 – Bill Haley. –  American singer-songwriter and guitarist (b. 1925)

2002 – Princess Margaret of the United Kingdom (b. 1930), the Queens younger sister.

2006 – Freddie Laker – British airline entrepreneur (b. 1922)

~  ❤  ~

*PLAYTIME BELL RINGS!

THESE  are the jokes, folks!

I’d like to start with the chimney jokes  –  I’ve got a stack of them.
I had a dream last night that I was cutting carrots with the Grim Reaper  –  dicing with death.
I saw a man chatting-up a cheetah and I thought:  ‘He’s trying to pull a fast one.’
I’ve decided to sell my Hoover  –  it was just collecting dust.
I went to the local supermarket and said:  ‘I want to make a complaint – this vinegar’s got lumps in it.’   He said:  ‘Those are pickled onions’.
You know, somebody actually complimented me on my driving today.  They left a little note on the windscreen, it said  ‘Parking Fine’.   So that was nice.  😀
I was in this restaurant and I asked for something herby.  They gave me a Volkswagen with no driver.
A lot of people cry when they cut onions.  –  The trick is not to form an emotional bond.

Q. What did the little boat say to the yacht?  A. Can I interest you in a little row-mance?

 Meanwhile, in a parallel universe:  “Oh for God’s sake! Where are all these extra single socks coming from?!”

Mr. Cobs and I often laugh about how competitive we are.   But I laugh more 😉

and finally ….
did you know …..

Moses had the first tablet that could connect to the cloud!

❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤

Now, shall we have a coffee and a moment of contemplation?  . . .

Cup of Coffee

Thought for the Day

What would you do if you weren’t afraid?

Fear can make you stand still – and that’s not what we were made for.  Instead, use fear as a tool and not as a handicap.

Fear is inbuilt into us because it’s that wise old owl who tells us not to go too close to the edge of the cliff, because the wind could take us over it.

Fear is that little voice that tells you not to get into the bath of hot water until you’ve tested the temperature first.  Fear is that thing that is one of your guides.

However,  what fear isn’t, is a stop sign for everything.

Fear shouldn’t make you stop.  Fear should just get you to think about the possibilities for a moment and then work out the best way to go about doing what you want to do.

Fear isn’t meant to hold you in the palm of its hand and manipulate you.

If you have a fear about something, then that’s ok.  But remind yourself that you are in control.  If fear is keeping you suspended animation then step out of it.

Work out what it is that is your worst fear.  Once you know that …  put it on one side …  sort of on a shelf in your brain.  Out of the way.  Because once you know what it is, you don’t need to keep going over it,  over and over and over again.

You simply have to acknowledge what your worst fear is and once you understand it, you can get on with your life, knowing that you know what the fear is, but not letting it stop you from enjoying what life has to offer you.

Now I ask again . . .   What would you do if you weren’t afraid?

LIVE your LIFE.

Don’t live your fear.

~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~  ❤  ~

Ok, that costly edumacation that your parents pay for is now over for another Friday.  I absolutely LOVE seeing you here, thank you so very much for coming.  It’s a total thrill to know that you’re visiting and having a read.  It makes ‘building’ this regular Friday ‘bit of fun’ all worthwhile.

Thank you to all who come for a visit, and an especially big  THANK YOU  to those who stay a few minutes to leave a bit of a chat behind.  It tickles the heck out of me when we get together on a Friday and all have a good old chin wag.

May your Friday be filled with happiness, peace and joy.  May your weekend be filled with contentment and love.  

Sending you squidges and love, from me here in my corner to you there in yours.

Sig coffee copy

The Friday Post ~ 8th September 2017

Happy Friday!  This week has flown by in one way, and yet it’s dragged it’s feet in another.

Something was missing in my life.  It’s seemed to be a long stretch of a week.  Then I realised what it was.  It was Little Cobs.  He went back to school on Tuesday so I haven’t seen him since last Saturday.  He’s a joyous handful when he’s here, but when he goes home my heart goes with him.   He’ll be here again on Saturday, and no doubt drag his  HUGE bag of cars out of his bedroom here, then he’ll search for the length of black drain pipe which I got Grandad to rub the ends of so that it wasn’t sharp, and he’ll prop the one end up on the footstool, and his cars will zoooom down the tube and we’ll find out who’s the winner!  It’s kind of his early introduction to betting.  LOL.  (No, we don’t use money or anything else.  We just use our eyes and guess which one will go the furthest)

Oh anyhoo …  look at me chatting away when what you’ve come for is some edumacation.  So let’s get going shall we?

On this Day in History

1504 – Michelangelo’s David is unveiled in Florence. Michelangelo’s David, sculpted from 1501 to 1504, is a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture and one of Michelangelo’s two greatest works of sculpture, along with the Pietà. It is the statue of the young Israelite king David alone that almost certainly is one of the most recognizable stone sculptures in the history of art. It is regarded as a symbol both of strength and youthful human beauty.

michelangelo_david2
Michelangelo’s David

The 5.17 meter (17 ft) marble statue portrays the Biblical King David in the nude, at the moment that he decides to battle with Goliath.

However; the proportions are not quite true to the human form; the head and upper body are somewhat larger than the proportions of the lower body. The hands are also larger than would be in regular proportions. While some have suggested that this is of the mannerist style, another explanation is that the statue was originally intended to be placed on a church façade or high pedestal, and that the proportions would appear correct when the statue was viewed from some distance below.

The apparently uncircumcised form would be at odds with Judaic practice, but would be consistent with the conventions of Renaissance art.

To protect it from damage, the sculpture was moved in 1873 to the Accademia Gallery in Florence, where it attracts many visitors. A replica was placed in the Piazza della Signoria in 1910.

The cast of David at the South Kensington Museum (now the Victoria and Albert Museum), had a detachable plaster fig leaf, added for visits by Queen Victoria and other important ladies, when it was hung on the figure using two strategically placed hooks; it is now displayed nearby.

In 1991, a deranged man attacked the statue with a hammer he had concealed beneath his jacket, in the process damaging the toes of the left foot before being restrained. The samples obtained from that incident allowed scientists to determine that the marble used was obtained from the Fantiscritti quarries in Miseglia, the central of three small valleys in Carrara. The marble in question contains many microscopic holes that cause it to deteriorate faster than other marbles. Because of the marble’s degradation, a controversy occurred in 2003, when the statue underwent its first major cleaning since 1843. Some experts opposed the use of water to clean the statue, fearing further deterioration. Under the direction of Dr. Franca Falleti, senior restorers Monica Eichmann and Cinzia Pamigoni began the job of restoring the statue. The restoration work was completed in 2004.

By the 20th century, Michelangelo’s David had become iconic shorthand for “culture” David has been endlessly reproduced, in plaster, imitation marble fibreglass, and lends an atmosphere of culture even in some unlikely settings, such as beach resorts, gambling casinos and model railroads.

1888 – In London, the body of murder victim, Annie Chapman, is found, disembowelled in an East London street, the second victim of ‘Jack the Ripper’.

1892 – The Pledge of Allegiance is first recited.

1900 – Galveston Hurricane of 1900: a powerful hurricane hits Galveston, Texas killing about 8,000 people.

1921 – 16-year-old Margaret Gorman won the Atlantic City Pageant’s Golden Mermaid trophy;  pageant officials later dubbed her the first Miss America.

1930 – 3M begins marketing Scotch transparent tape.

1943 – World War II: United States General Dwight D. Eisenhower publicly announces the Allied armistice with Italy.
1944 – World War II: London is hit by a V2 rocket as the first German V2 flying bombs fell on Britain, exploding at Chiswick in London, killing 3 people.

1960 – Publishers Penguin Books were charged with public obscenity for publishing D.H. Lawrence’s controversial book – ‘Lady Chatterley’s Lover’.
1960 – In Huntsville, Alabama, US President Dwight D. Eisenhower formally dedicates the Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA had already activated the facility on July 1).

1966 – In England, the Severn Bridge was officially opened by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, linking south Wales with south west England.
1966 – The first Star Trek,  the landmark American science fiction television series, premieres with the first-aired episode, “The Man Trap”, on NBC.

1968 – The Beatles perform their last live TV performance on the David Frost show. They perform their new hit Hey Jude.
1968 – British tennis player Virginia Wade beat American Billie Jean King to win the US Open.

1974 – Watergate Scandal: US President Gerald Ford pardons former President Richard Nixon for any crimes Nixon may have committed while in office.

1975 – Gays in the military: US Air Force Tech Sergeant Leonard Matlovich, a decorated veteran of the Vietnam War, appears in his Air Force uniform on the cover of Time magazine with the headline “I Am A Homosexual”.  He is given a general discharge, which was later upgraded to honorable.

2004 – The NASA unmanned spacecraft Genesis crash-lands when its parachute fails to open. The Genesis spacecraft was the first ever attempt to collect a sample of solar wind, and the first “sample return mission” to return from beyond the orbit of the Moon. It was launched on August 8, 2001, and crash-landed on September 8, 2004 after a design flaw prevented the deployment of its drogue parachute. The crash contaminated many of the sample collectors, but subsequent processing was able to isolate useful samples, and as of March 2008 all of the mission’s major science objectives are expected to be achieved successfully.

Born on this Day

1921 – Harry Secombe, Welsh entertainer (d. 2001)
1922 – Sid Caesar, American comedian (d. 2014)
1925 – Peter Sellers, English actor (d. 1980)
1932 – Patsy Cline, American singer (d. 1963)

1979 – Pink, American singer-songwriter, producer, and actress

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OK… now it’s playtime.  (All schools have a playtime, and this one is no different) …

I will only give you links to click on that I’ve tried and tested and know for sure that there is nothing bad hiding in them.  So please rest assured that any link you find on this blog has been tested before I load it here.  I’ve been playing around with most of these links for … oh my goodness, around ten years, so I know for sure that they’re safe.

Today …  instead of a game, I share with you something that I have tons of fun on every now and again.

If you don’t have a Gravatar picture of yourself,  or a photo of yourself on your blog in your sidebar – then you can ‘build’ yourself on this website!  It’s not really you as such, but it’s ‘you’ in a cartoony sort of way.

You can build a body, a skin tone, hair, lips, teeth, eyes, glasses, facial hair,  even tattoos!  You can make it look like you … but if you were stood in a line up, no one would be able to pick you out based on that image.  lol.  Aww … look, I’ll give you the link so that you can have a play with it yourself.  It’s lots of fun… BUT …  have a look around first, and click on the things so that you know what they look like… because once you have chosen some of the things there, you can’t undo them  (some you can change – but not all of them). . . and you’ll have to start from the beginning.  Other than that, it’s a great little time waster.

click —> http://www.sp-studio.de/  …  it will open in a new window for you.

Well we’ve come to the end of the school day, here in Cobweborium Land.  Don’t you wish all your school/work days were as short as this?  A bit of fun, over a cup of coffee and time to go off and relax!  lol

Wishing you all a truly wonderful weekend.  Thank you so much for coming and spending a little time with me.  I love seeing you here.

May your weekend be everything you want it to be.  🌹

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